Research2021-04-08T12:06:28-04:00

Publications

Gender Wage Gap in Year Two
Gender Wage Gaps Remain in Year Two of Pandemic

In year two of COVID-19, the gender wage gap remained sizeable—and was widest for Black and Hispanic women—based on IWPR’s analysis of median weekly earnings for full-time workers.

A Future Worth Building

Based on the largest national survey of tradeswomen ever conducted, with over 2,600 responses, IWPR's new report shows that more than four in ten women working in the construction trades have seriously considered leaving their jobs. Discrimination and harassment are among the main reasons that women depart the industry.

Lost Jobs, Stalled Progress
Lost Jobs, Stalled Progress: The Impact of the “She-Cession” on Equal Pay

In year one of COVID-19, the gender wage gap narrowed slightly only for full-time, year-round workers, with women in low-paying jobs bearing the brunt of the crisis. For all workers, the gender gap widened slightly.

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Making “Free College” Programs Work for College Students with Children

DOWNLOAD REPORT Making “Free College” Programs Work for College Students with Children College is one of the most reliable routes to economic security for parents and their children. College credentials are linked to increased earnings, higher rates of employment, lower poverty rates, and [...]

Work Supports for Adult Health: The Role of Paid Family and Medical Leave

Many Americans struggle to balance work and caregiving responsibilities. As the United States population ages — with the U.S. Census Bureau projecting that by 2035 those 65 and older will outnumber the youth for the first time in history – the number of men and women who are providing care for someone age 65 and older will continue to increase. In addition, one in seven people live with an adult with a disability.

By |May 31, 2019|Presentation|

Women, Automation, and the Future of Work (Executive Summary)

According to Women, Automation, and the Future of Work, an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) report, technological change will affect men and women differently in a number of ways. The first study of its kind in the United States, this report estimates the risk of automation across occupations by gender and presents a comprehensive picture of what we know—and what we don’t—about how the future of work will affect women workers.

Women, Automation, and the Future of Work

DOWNLOAD REPORT Read the full report Read the executive summary INTRODUCTION Why the Analysis of Technological Change Needs a Gender Perspective Automation, artificial intelligence, and other technological changes are already affecting the number and quality of jobs. The number of workers employed in [...]

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