Research2021-04-08T12:06:28-05:00

Publications

2023 Native Women EPD Fact Sheet
Native Women Will Not Reach Pay Equity with White Men until 2144

November 30 is Native Women's Equal Pay Day and the inequities continue. In 2022, Native American and Alaskan Native women were paid only 54.7 cents per dollar paid to non-Hispanic White men. Native women working full-time year-round were paid just 58.9 cents for every dollar (a wage gap of 41.1 percent). Read more from the latest IWPR fact sheet.

2023 Education poll
Majorities See Education as a Worthwhile Investment and Favor Student Debt Forgiveness in New IWPR Poll

Check out IWPR's latest poll on public attitudes towards college education, student debt, affirmative action and recent Supreme Court decisions on these important issues.

Latina EPD 2023
New Data: Latinas Will Not Reach Pay Equity with White Men until 2207

In 2022, Latinas working full-time year-round were paid just 57.5 cents for every dollar paid to White, non-Hispanic men, an astounding gap that will take almost two centuries to remedy.

Wage Gap Sept 2023
Nationwide Women Still Make 84 Cents for Every Dollar a Man Makes, Won't Reach Pay Equity Until 2053

Pay inequities remain a key challenge for women in the workforce. New data shows how little progress is being made and how far we still have to go.

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The Status of Women in Florida by County: Population & Diversity

This briefing paper highlights demographic information relevant to the status of women in Florida. It explores differences between women and men on a range of variables, including age, race and ethnicity, marital status, household type, immigration status, geography, and veteran status.

By Julie Anderson, Cynthia Hess, Ph.D. and Gina Chirillo|December 8, 2016|Briefing Paper, Status of Women|

Supportive Services in Job Training and Education: A Research Review

DOWNLOAD REPORT This report presents findings from a review and analysis of literature on the importance, effectiveness, and availability of support services for participants in job training programs in the United States. It assesses current knowledge about these services by examining reports on [...]

Girls and Young Women of Color: Where They Are in the United States

Of the 14.1 million girls and young women of color, age 10–24, in the United States, 40.7 percent (5,748,760) live in the South, 23.2 percent in the Pacific West, 14.9 percent in the Northeast, 10.4 percent in East North Central, 7.3 percent in the Mountain West, and 3.5 percent in West North Central, as shown in Map 1.

Women of Color: Where They Are in the United States

Of the 42.3 million women of color, age 18 and older, in the United States, 41.5 percent (17,537,563) live in the South, 23.2 percent in the Pacific West, 16.3 percent in the Northeast, 9.8 percent in East North Central, 6.4 percent in the Mountain West, and 2.9 percent in West North Central.

Breadwinner Mothers by Race/Ethnicity and State

With the large majority of U.S. mothers in the labor force and a steady decline in the real earnings of all workers over recent decades, families are increasingly relying on mothers’ earnings for economic stability. In the United States, half of all households with children under 18 have a breadwinner mother, who is either a single mother who heads a household, irrespective of earnings, or a married mother who provides at least 40 percent of the couple’s joint earnings.

Black Women Are Among Those Who Saw the Largest Declines in Wages over the Last Decade

Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of data from the American Community Survey finds that between 2004 and 2014, Black women’s real median annual earnings for full-time, year-round work declined by 5.0 percent—more than three times as much as women’s earnings overall.

By Asha DuMonthier|August 22, 2016|Quick Figure, Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Economy|
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