Research2021-04-08T12:06:28-05:00

Publications

Gender Wage Gap in Year Two
Gender Wage Gaps Remain in Year Two of Pandemic

In year two of COVID-19, the gender wage gap remained sizeable—and was widest for Black and Hispanic women—based on IWPR’s analysis of median weekly earnings for full-time workers.

A Future Worth Building

Based on the largest national survey of tradeswomen ever conducted, with over 2,600 responses, IWPR's new report shows that more than four in ten women working in the construction trades have seriously considered leaving their jobs. Discrimination and harassment are among the main reasons that women depart the industry.

Lost Jobs, Stalled Progress
Lost Jobs, Stalled Progress: The Impact of the “She-Cession” on Equal Pay

In year one of COVID-19, the gender wage gap narrowed slightly only for full-time, year-round workers, with women in low-paying jobs bearing the brunt of the crisis. For all workers, the gender gap widened slightly.

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The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation 2019

Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women. Data for both women’s and men’s median weekly earnings for full-time work are available for 125 occupations.

The Gender Wage Gap: 2019 Earnings Differences by Race and Ethnicity

The gender wage gap in weekly earnings for full-time workers in the United States narrowed marginally between 2018 and 2019. In 2019, the ratio of women’s to men’s median weekly full-time earnings was 81.5 percent, an increase of 0.4 percent since 2018, when the ratio was 81.1 percent, leaving a wage gap of 18.5 percent, compared with 18.9 percent in 2018.

Gender Political Parity in the U.S. Congress: Women Will Wait 88 Years before Achieving Equal Representation

DOWNLOAD REPORT Women are a vital and integral part of building strong communities, and equal participation of women in elective office is crucial to a fair and equitable democracy. By running for office, women shape laws, policies, and decision-making in ways that reflect [...]

By |March 5, 2020|Briefing Paper, IWPR|

Women-Owned Businesses Have Increased in Number, but Still Face Obstacles to Growth

Women have made considerable progress in increasing their representation among business owners in recent years. The number of women-owned businesses increased in almost every industry between 2002 and 2012, at rates higher than those of men-owned businesses.

Integrating Workforce Development Programs and Pregnancy Prevention Services

This briefing paper explores the availability of and need for pregnancy prevention services among individuals enrolled in job training in the United States.

Geographic Mobility, Gender, and the Future of Work

Geographically, economic opportunity is unequally distributed across the United States. A disproportionate share of all private-sector jobs—one in five—are located in just four metropolitan areas: New York, San Francisco, Chicago, and Seattle.

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