Informing Policy, Inspiring Change, Improving LivesAdministrator2024-02-09T09:02:27-05:00
BMHW 24
April 11-17 is Black Maternal Health Week!

America’s ongoing Black maternal health crisis is a national tragedy that goes largely unnoticed in our society. The US has more maternal deaths than any other ‘wealthy’ nation, and Black women are around three times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than White women. Many of these deaths are preventable.

2024 Care conf POST-EVENT
IWPR's 2024 Care Conference was a huge success!

Thank you to everyone who attended in person or virtually Friday April 5! You can view the livestreamed sessions here and check back often for additional video recordings, photos from the event, and speaker presentations!

IWPR caregiving poll
Check out IWPR's Latest Poll on Caregiving and Women in the Workforce

Care is the cornerstone of economic activity, yet it remains undervalued and underfunded in the American economy, adversely impacting caregivers and those in need. IWPR's recent poll of women in the workforce details the concerns that many caregivers have about the impact of their responsibilities on their future careers and future financial security.

CEO announcement
EPD 2024 Wage Gap Fact Sheet
On Equal Pay Day 2024, New IWPR Report Reveals that Women Earn Less than Men in All Occupations, Even Ones Commonly Held by Women

Women are paid eighty-four (84) cents for every dollar a man makes, a persistent gender wage gap that spans all professions, even those typically held by women, according to a new report released by IWPR

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GENDER AND RACIAL WAGE GAPS MARGINALLY IMPROVE IN 2022 BUT PAY EQUITY STILL DECADES AWAY

In 2022, women working full-time year-round made 84.0 cents per dollar earned by men (a wage gap of 16.0 percent), a marginal improvement compared to 2021 (83.7 cents per dollar) and significantly higher than in pre-COVID-19 2019 (82.3 cents).1 Based on median annual earnings in 2022, this meant $9,990 fewer dollars in the pockets of a typical woman who worked full-time year-round.

BLACK WOMEN HAVE MADE MAJOR GAINS IN HIGHER EDUCATION, BUT BLACK SINGLE MOTHERS STILL STRUGGLE TO ATTAIN DEGREES

This fact sheet aims to provide college leaders, student parent advocates, and policymakers with data to better understand the landscape for Black single mother students on a national level and prompt considerations for racial and gender equity and investments in institutional resources and supportive services.

UNDERWATER: STUDENT MOTHERS AND FATHERS STRUGGLE TO SUPPORT THEIR FAMILIES AND PAY OFF COLLEGE LOANS

Student parents often face enormous financial barriers to academic success. They report high financial insecurity including issues with food, housing and other basic needs that may result in leaving college early without a credential, which has implications for future earnings. Check out IWPR’s latest research on this often-overlooked population.

The Status of Women in Florida Reproductive Rights

This White Paper provides an overview of reproductive rights in Florida. The report outlines the historical and political context of reproductive rights in the state and summarizes key data and outcomes. The report concludes with policy recommendations and areas for future research.

Advancing Women in Manufacturing: Perspectives from Women on the Shop Floor

Careers in manufacturing can provide high earnings and good benefits. After years of decline,the manufacturing industry is growing again. Manufacturing employs one in ten workers in the United States but fewer than a third of workers are women,and women are particularly underrepresented in many higher-earning shop floor positions that typically do not require a four-year college degree.

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