Eve Mefferd

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About Eve Mefferd

Eve Mefferd is a Research Assistant for Employment and Earnings at IWPR. Eve served as an Intern at IWPR in 2019, during which time she assisted in the production of IWPR’s report, “Women, Automation, and the Future of Work." Prior to her work with IWPR, Eve was employed as a Research Assistant at Bennington College. Her work with Deborah M. Warnock, focusing on the predictors of belonging and integration of first generation, low-income, and working class college students, was accepted for panel presentation at the 2020 American Sociological Association conference. Eve was also sponsored by the Lumina Foundation for a project on work integrated learning in higher education. Eve received her Bachelor's degree in Sociology and Public Policy from Bennington College, with a focus on socioeconomic class, housing, and educational policy. She has also received a certificate in Public Policy Analysis from the London School of Economics. Her senior thesis, a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the impact of gentrification on educational outcomes in Los Angeles, was selected for presentation at the 2020 ASA Student Forum. Eve served as President of the Student Educational Policies Committee at Bennington College, and is a 2020 American Sociological Association honors recipient.

Shortchanged and Underpaid: Black Women and the Pay Gap

The COVID-19 pandemic and related recession has both highlighted the persistent inequalities that Black women face in the labor market and exacerbated them. Black women were overrepresented in many low-paying jobs that were recognized as “essential” during the pandemic, but had often been dismissed as “low-skilled” before. [...]

Paying Today and Tomorrow: Charting the Financial Costs of Workplace Sexual Harassment

Sexual harassment remains deeply pervasive in the workplace, wreaking havoc on the lives of survivors. This report fills a gap in our knowledge of the economic costs of sexual harassment for the individual women and men who experience it. Drawing on in-depth interviews with survivors of workplace sexual harassment and stakeholder experts, and a review of the literature, the report provides a detailed pathway for capturing the financial consequences of workplace sexual harassment for individual workers in both the short term and over their lifetimes. The research is based on a collaboration between the Institute for Women’s Policy Research and the TIME’S UP Foundation and presents the first step towards identifying the data needed for a comprehensive national assessment of the financial and economic costs of sexual harassment. 

Even as Payroll Jobs Recover, Young Workers Face Unemployment and a Hostile Labor Market

New June jobs data show the strongest monthly job growth for women since August 2020. Despite this, it will still take women another 9.3 months to get back to pre-COVID-10 levels, compared with 6.7 months for men. Further, the unemployment rate increased slightly, with rates of unemployment remaining twice as high for younger workers.

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation, Race, and Ethnicity 2020

In 2020, women earned less than men in almost all occupations, whether they worked in predominantly male, predominantly female, or more integrated occupations. In the lowest paid of the largest 20 occupations for women, Maids and Housekeepers ($503 per week), women are nine-in-ten workers (and face a wage gap of 10.6 percent); in the highest paid of the largest 20 occupations for men, Chief Executives ($2,402 per week), women are fewer than one-in-three workers (and face a wage gap of 24.4 percent).

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