Eve Mefferd

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About Eve Mefferd

Eve Mefferd is a Research Assistant for Employment and Earnings at IWPR. Eve served as an Intern at IWPR in 2019, during which time she assisted in the production of IWPR’s report, “Women, Automation, and the Future of Work." Prior to her work with IWPR, Eve was employed as a Research Assistant at Bennington College. Her work with Deborah M. Warnock, focusing on the predictors of belonging and integration of first generation, low-income, and working class college students, was accepted for panel presentation at the 2020 American Sociological Association conference. Eve was also sponsored by the Lumina Foundation for a project on work integrated learning in higher education. Eve received her Bachelor's degree in Sociology and Public Policy from Bennington College, with a focus on socioeconomic class, housing, and educational policy. She has also received a certificate in Public Policy Analysis from the London School of Economics. Her senior thesis, a qualitative and quantitative analysis of the impact of gentrification on educational outcomes in Los Angeles, was selected for presentation at the 2020 ASA Student Forum. Eve served as President of the Student Educational Policies Committee at Bennington College, and is a 2020 American Sociological Association honors recipient.

Building a Better Future for Women in New Orleans Post COVID-19: Opportunities for Women in Skilled Trade and Technical Jobs

Women in New Orleans are particularly severely affected by COVID-19 related job losses because they are more likely than men to work in leisure and hospitality and tourism. Women are much less likely than men to work in construction, manufacturing, transportation, and Port-related jobs,

Women’s Share of Unemployment Insurance Claimants varies Strongly Across States

In 42 of 50 states and DC, women were the majority of unemployment insurance claimants. A third of all unemployed women, and four in ten Latinas, have been out of work for more than 26 weeks. The receipt of unemployment benefits, including those provided under the CARES Act, substantially reduces but do not eliminate the odds of hunger or foreclosure threats for women and their families.

Despite modest employment gains, women still 5.5 million jobs below pre-pandemic level

New October jobs data show women gained 280,000 (43.9 percent) of 638,000 new non-farm payroll jobs since October.

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