Research2021-04-08T12:06:28-04:00

Publications

Gender Wage Gap in Year Two
Gender Wage Gaps Remain in Year Two of Pandemic

In year two of COVID-19, the gender wage gap remained sizeable—and was widest for Black and Hispanic women—based on IWPR’s analysis of median weekly earnings for full-time workers.

A Future Worth Building

Based on the largest national survey of tradeswomen ever conducted, with over 2,600 responses, IWPR's new report shows that more than four in ten women working in the construction trades have seriously considered leaving their jobs. Discrimination and harassment are among the main reasons that women depart the industry.

Lost Jobs, Stalled Progress
Lost Jobs, Stalled Progress: The Impact of the “She-Cession” on Equal Pay

In year one of COVID-19, the gender wage gap narrowed slightly only for full-time, year-round workers, with women in low-paying jobs bearing the brunt of the crisis. For all workers, the gender gap widened slightly.

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Ending Sex and Race Discrimination in the Workplace: Legal Interventions That Push the Envelope (Executive Summary)

This report draws on the IWPR/WAGE Consent Decree Database to analyze the injunctive relief awarded in 502 sex and/or race discrimination settlements that became effective between 2000 and 2008. (Executive Summary)

Organizations Working with Latina Immigrants: Resources and Strategies for Change

DOWNLOAD REPORT IWPR’s study explored the challenges many Latina immigrants face and the ways that nonprofit organizations and congregations strive to address them in three areas with rapidly growing immigrant populations: Atlanta, Georgia; Phoenix, Arizona; and Northern Virginia, a region within the Washington, [...]

Separate and Not Equal? Gender Segregation in the Labor Market and the Gender Wage Gap

Occupational gender segregation is a strong feature of the US labor market. While some occupations have become increasingly integrated over time, others remain highly dominated by either men or women. Our analysis of trends in overall gender segregation shows that, after a considerable move towards more integrated occupations in the 1970s and 1980s, progress has completely stalled since the mid 1990s.

Women, Disasters, and Hurricane Katrina

Major disasters during the last decade have pushed planners and researchers to examine more closely the disparities among those hurt when crises hit. Research suggests that women often suffer disproportionately in comparison to most men when disaster strikes, while the elderly, and people in poverty, are more vulnerable than those with more mobility and those with greater access to resources.

Child Care Support for Student Parents in Community College Is Crucial for Success, but Supply and Funding Are Inadequate

Of the over 6 million students earning college credit at community colleges, 1.7 million (27 percent) are parents. Of those, about 1 million (16 percent) are single parents, more than twice the proportion at 4-year institutions. Three-quarters of single parents in college are women.

By |May 31, 2010|Fact Sheet, Student Parent Success Initiative|
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