Research2021-04-08T12:06:28-05:00

Publications

2023 Native Women EPD Fact Sheet
Native Women Will Not Reach Pay Equity with White Men until 2144

November 30 is Native Women's Equal Pay Day and the inequities continue. In 2022, Native American and Alaskan Native women were paid only 54.7 cents per dollar paid to non-Hispanic White men. Native women working full-time year-round were paid just 58.9 cents for every dollar (a wage gap of 41.1 percent). Read more from the latest IWPR fact sheet.

2023 Education poll
Majorities See Education as a Worthwhile Investment and Favor Student Debt Forgiveness in New IWPR Poll

Check out IWPR's latest poll on public attitudes towards college education, student debt, affirmative action and recent Supreme Court decisions on these important issues.

Latina EPD 2023
New Data: Latinas Will Not Reach Pay Equity with White Men until 2207

In 2022, Latinas working full-time year-round were paid just 57.5 cents for every dollar paid to White, non-Hispanic men, an astounding gap that will take almost two centuries to remedy.

Wage Gap Sept 2023
Nationwide Women Still Make 84 Cents for Every Dollar a Man Makes, Won't Reach Pay Equity Until 2053

Pay inequities remain a key challenge for women in the workforce. New data shows how little progress is being made and how far we still have to go.

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Black Women Are Among Those Who Saw the Largest Declines in Wages over the Last Decade

Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of data from the American Community Survey finds that between 2004 and 2014, Black women’s real median annual earnings for full-time, year-round work declined by 5.0 percent—more than three times as much as women’s earnings overall.

By Asha DuMonthier|August 22, 2016|Quick Figure, Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Economy|

Student Parents’ Access to Campus Child Care Continued to Decline in 2015

Given the importance of higher education to a family’s economic security and their children’s future success, ensuring that student parents have access to affordable, quality care must be a priority for educational institutions, higher education advocates, and policymakers.

By IWPR|July 27, 2016|Quick Figure, Student Parent Success Initiative|

The Economic Impact of Equal Pay by State

Persistent earnings inequality for working women translates into lower lifetime pay for women, less income for families, and higher rates of poverty across the United States. In each state in the country, women experience lower earnings and higher poverty rates than men.

By IWPR|February 25, 2016|Economic, Security, Mobility, and Equity, Fact Sheet|

The Status of Women in the South

The Status of Women in the South builds on IWPR’s long-standing analyses and reports, The Status of Women in the States, that have provided data on the status of women nationally and for all 50 states plus the District of Columbia since 1996. The Status of Women in the South uses data from U.S. government and other sources to analyze women’s status in the southern United States, including Alabama, Arkansas, the District of Columbia, Florida Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.

Women and Men Share Stronger Job Gains in December—Women’s Unemployment Rate Is at 4.8 Percent; Men’s at 5.2 Percent

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the January employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) finds that women gained 141,000 jobs and men gained 151,000 for a total of 292,000 jobs added in December.

By Jeff Hayes|January 8, 2016|Economic, Security, Mobility, and Equity, Quick Figure|
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