Cynthia Hess, Ph.D.

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About Cynthia Hess

Cynthia Hess is Chief Operating Officer (COO) at IWPR and Scholar in Residence at American University. In her role as COO, Cynthia oversees the operations of the Institute while working with program staff to support the execution of research and other projects. As COO, Cynthia serves as a member of the executive leadership team within the organization and works closely with the President and staff to develop and implement organizational systems and processes to maximize efficiency and support future growth. Prior to her position as COO, Cynthia served as Associate Director of Research, directing IWPR’s research on numerous issues including projects on intimate partner violence, workforce development, and women’s leadership and activism. Under her tenure, IWPR expanded its longstanding Status of Women in States project and launched an accompanying website, statusofwomendata.org. Cynthia has been quoted in a number of media outlets including The Washington Post, Fortune, Governing magazine and, The Boston Globe. Before joining the Institute for Women’s Policy Research, Dr. Hess taught for two years as a visiting faculty member in the Philosophy and Religious Studies Department at St. Mary’s College of Maryland. She received her Ph.D. in Theology from Yale University and her A.B. from Davidson College.

Integrating Workforce Development Programs and Pregnancy Prevention Services

This briefing paper explores the availability of and need for pregnancy prevention services among individuals enrolled in job training in the United States.

By |2020-08-10T02:44:53+00:00February 13, 2020|Briefing Paper, Center on the Economics of Reproductive Health|Comments Off on Integrating Workforce Development Programs and Pregnancy Prevention Services

Providing Unpaid Household and Care Work in the United States: Uncovering Inequality

In the United States, women spend considerably more time than men over their lifetime doing unpaid household and care work. The unequal distribution of this work—work that is essential for families and societies to thrive—not only limits women’s career choices and economic empowerment, but also affects their overall health and well-being.

By |2020-08-10T14:19:35+00:00January 20, 2020|Job Quality and Income Security, Report|Comments Off on Providing Unpaid Household and Care Work in the United States: Uncovering Inequality

The Future of Care Work: Improving the Quality of America’s Fastest-Growing Jobs

Paid adult care work jobs are expected to increase substantially in the coming years, due to both an aging population and a comparatively low risk of automation for many of these jobs.

By |2020-08-10T01:44:47+00:00September 23, 2019|Employment and Earnings, Report|Comments Off on The Future of Care Work: Improving the Quality of America’s Fastest-Growing Jobs

Dreams Deferred: A Survey on the Impact of Intimate Partner Violence on Survivors’ Education, Careers, and Economic Security

This report examines the educational, career, and economic effects of intimate partner violence by presenting findings from a survey of 164 survivors developed by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) and administered at transitional housing programs, shelters, and other domestic violence programs in 11 states and the District of Columbia.

By |2020-09-08T15:00:35+00:00October 24, 2018|Report|0 Comments

Sexual Harassment and Assault at Work: Understanding the Costs

Through a review of the current literature on sexual harassment and assault, this briefing paper highlights how workplace sexual harassment and assault affect women’s economic advancement and security, and the costs of these harms to employers (including estimates of financial losses where available). It also provides recommendations for preventing sexual harassment and reducing the negative effects of harassment for individuals and workplaces.

Supports that Matter in Workforce Development Programs: A National Client Survey on Access to Services

This report presents findings from a national, online survey of more than 1,800 participants in job training programs. It captures their perspectives on the role of supportive services such as child care and transportation assistance in facilitating their success in job training, the availability of supportive services across different types of training programs, the unmet support needs of program participants, and the significance of job training for their lives.

The Status of Women in Florida by County: Population & Diversity

This briefing paper highlights demographic information relevant to the status of women in Florida. It explores differences between women and men on a range of variables, including age, race and ethnicity, marital status, household type, immigration status, geography, and veteran status.

By |2020-08-27T02:10:48+00:00December 8, 2016|Briefing Paper, Status of Women|Comments Off on The Status of Women in Florida by County: Population & Diversity

The Status of Women in the States: 2015

The Status of Women in the States: 2015 provides critical data to identify areas of progress for women in states across the nation and pinpoint where additional improvements are still needed. It presents hundreds of data points for each state across seven areas that affect women’s lives: political participation, employment and earnings, work and family, poverty and opportunity, reproductive rights, health and well-being, and violence and safety.

By |2020-08-26T23:23:39+00:00May 20, 2015|Report, Status of Women|Comments Off on The Status of Women in the States: 2015