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Women Gained Over Half of the Jobs Added in February; Men Have Regained 82 Percent of Jobs Lost in the Recession

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the March employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), women gained 99,000 jobs in February, while men gained 76,000 for a net increase of 175,000 jobs in February. As of February, men have regained 82 percent (4.9 million) of the jobs they lost during the recession, whereas women hold 17 percent more jobs on payrolls (68.0 million) than at their previous employment peak in March 2008 (67.6 million), more than recovering all the jobs they lost in the downturn.

By |2014-03-07T00:00:00-05:00March 7, 2014|Press Releases|Comments Off on Women Gained Over Half of the Jobs Added in February; Men Have Regained 82 Percent of Jobs Lost in the Recession

Earned Sick Time in Chicago Would Benefit Business, Reduce Health Care Costs

Washington, DC—As Chicago City Council legislators consider the Earned Sick Time Ordinance, new research from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) estimates that providing paid sick days to newly covered workers is expected to yield savings of more than $6.4 million annually, after employer costs and benefits are calculated.

By |2014-03-05T00:00:00-05:00March 5, 2014|Press Releases|Comments Off on Earned Sick Time in Chicago Would Benefit Business, Reduce Health Care Costs

44% of San Diegans Lack Access to Earned Sick Days

A new analysis by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) finds that 44 percent of San Diego’s private sector employees lack access to a single earned sick day. More than half of San Diego's Hispanic workers (55%) lack access to earned sick days, compared with forty percent of both black and white workers.

By |2014-02-26T00:00:00-05:00February 26, 2014|Press Releases|Comments Off on 44% of San Diegans Lack Access to Earned Sick Days

Women’s Job Growth Halts in January; Men Have Regained 81 Percent of Jobs Lost in the Recession

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the February employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), women lost 51,000 jobs on nonfarm payrolls in January, while men gained 164,000 for a net increase of 113,000 jobs. As of January, women have more than recovered all their jobs lost in the recession, while men have regained 81 percent (4.9 million) of the jobs they lost.

By |2014-02-07T00:00:00-05:00February 7, 2014|Press Releases|Comments Off on Women’s Job Growth Halts in January; Men Have Regained 81 Percent of Jobs Lost in the Recession

Equal Pay for Working Women would Boost the Economy

On the fifth anniversary of the signing of the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act—a bill that reinstated women’s ability to contest unlawful pay discrimination and was the first bill signed into law by President Obama—analysis from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) finds that the poverty rate for working women would be cut in half if women were paid the same as comparable men, and that greater pay transparency would increase women’s pay.

By |2014-01-29T00:00:00-05:00January 29, 2014|Press Releases|Comments Off on Equal Pay for Working Women would Boost the Economy

How Equal Pay for Working Women would Reduce Poverty and Grow the American Economy

According to a regression analysis of federal data by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), the poverty rate for working women would be cut in half if women were paid the same as comparable men. The analysis—prepared by IWPR for use in The Shriver Report’s A Woman’s Nation Pushes Back from the Brink, produced in partnership with the Center for American Progress—also estimates that the U.S. economy would have produced income of $447.6 billion more if women received equal pay, which represents 2.9 percent of 2012 gross domestic product (GDP).

By |2014-01-13T00:00:00-05:00January 13, 2014|Press Releases|Comments Off on How Equal Pay for Working Women would Reduce Poverty and Grow the American Economy

Job Growth in December Due Entirely to Women’s Employment Gains

According to an Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the January employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), women gained all 74,000 jobs added to nonfarm payrolls in December, while men lost 1,000 jobs (women’s jobs gains were actually 75,000). Men hold 1.5 million more jobs than women as of December, a number which is substantially less than at the start of the recession, when men held 3.4 million more jobs.

By |2014-01-10T00:00:00-05:00January 10, 2014|Press Releases|Comments Off on Job Growth in December Due Entirely to Women’s Employment Gains

Newark’s Earned Sick Days Law Would Improve Public Health, Reduce Costs

Providing earned sick days is expected to save Newark employers more than $4 million per year, according to a new analysis by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR). The city’s proposed earned sick days legislation, “Workers Sick Leave Ordinance,” would reduce costs to employers in Newark, and decrease the spread of contagious illnesses yielding further public health costs savings.

By |2013-12-17T00:00:00-05:00December 17, 2013|Press Releases|Comments Off on Newark’s Earned Sick Days Law Would Improve Public Health, Reduce Costs

Job Growth for Women and Men Continues; Unemployment Rates at Five-Year Lows

According to analysis by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), due to continued job growth in November, women hold more jobs on payrolls than ever before (women initially surpassed their previous employment peak in October). Men have regained 75 percent (4.5 million) of the jobs they lost during the recession. Of the 2.3 million jobs added to payrolls in the last year, 51 percent were filled by women, and 49 percent were filled by men. Nonetheless, men held 1.6 million more jobs than women in November.

By |2013-12-06T00:00:00-05:00December 6, 2013|Press Releases|Comments Off on Job Growth for Women and Men Continues; Unemployment Rates at Five-Year Lows
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