Briefing Paper

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Women of Color: Where They Are in the United States

Of the 42.3 million women of color, age 18 and older, in the United States, 41.5 percent (17,537,563) live in the South, 23.2 percent in the Pacific West, 16.3 percent in the Northeast, 9.8 percent in East North Central, 6.4 percent in the Mountain West, and 2.9 percent in West North Central.

By |2020-09-09T17:09:42-04:00October 19, 2016|Briefing Paper, Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Economy|Comments Off on Women of Color: Where They Are in the United States

Poverty, Gender, and Public Policies

Over the last few decades, women’s increased labor force participation, education, and earnings have helped many women attain economic security. Yet, a substantial number of women in the United States face economic hardship.

The Union Advantage for Women

This briefing paper presents an analysis of women’s union membership and the union wage and benefit advantage for women by state and by race/ethnicity. It is based on an analysis of the Current Population Survey. Wage and benefit data are for all workers covered by a union contract, irrespective of their membership in a union.

College Affordability for Low-Income Adults: Improving Returns on Investment for Families and Society

This report was prepared by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) as a part of a series of papers on defining college affordability sponsored by the Lumina Foundation. The report examines how efforts to understand and improve college affordability can be informed by the experiences and circumstances of low-income adults, students of color, and students with dependent children.

By |2021-05-27T09:05:23-04:00April 5, 2014|Briefing Paper, Student Parent Success Initiative|Comments Off on College Affordability for Low-Income Adults: Improving Returns on Investment for Families and Society

How Equal Pay for Working Women would Reduce Poverty and Grow the American Economy

Persistent earnings inequality for working women translates into lower pay, less family income, and more poverty in families with a working woman, which is of no small consequence to working families.

College Students with Children are Common and Face Many Challenges in Completing Higher Education Summary

The role of parenthood in postsecondary outcomes needs greater focus from the higher education reform community.

Increasing Pathways to Legal Status for Immigrant In-Home Care Workers

This paper explores options for reforming the U.S. visa system to increase the pathways to legal status for undocumented immigrant women interested in providing long-term care for the elderly and for individuals with disabilities and chronic illnesses.

By |2021-05-07T14:28:59-04:00February 11, 2013|Briefing Paper, IWPR, Publications|Comments Off on Increasing Pathways to Legal Status for Immigrant In-Home Care Workers

Separate and Not Equal? Gender Segregation in the Labor Market and the Gender Wage Gap

Occupational gender segregation is a strong feature of the US labor market. While some occupations have become increasingly integrated over time, others remain highly dominated by either men or women. Our analysis of trends in overall gender segregation shows that, after a considerable move towards more integrated occupations in the 1970s and 1980s, progress has completely stalled since the mid 1990s.

Women and Men’s Employment and Unemployment in the Great Recession

Since December 2007, the U.S. economy has been in the worst recession since the Great Depression of the 1930s. Because much of the slowdown has occurred in traditionally male fields such as manufacturing and construction while a few traditionally female fields such as health and education have shown job growth or minimal job loss, many reports have focused on the job losses among men in the labor force.

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