Elyse Shaw, M.A.

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About Elyse Shaw

Elyse Shaw is a Study Director at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. Elyse directs IWPR’s projects on the Status of Women in the United States, women’s political participation, and those related to women and girls of color, which examines the intersectional nature of race and gender on women’s lives. Elyse also works extensively on workforce development and job training initiatives and contributes to IWPR’s research on global women’s issues, including providing technical assistance to the United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organization on the establishment of a gender policy institute in Palestine. Elyse has presented IWPR research on numerous webinars, panels, and to visiting international thought leaders and has provided commentary on a broad range of research topics. She has been quoted in several local and national outlets including The Washington Post and Public Radio International. She authored or co-authored several publications, including Assets for Equity: Building Wealth for Women in Central Ohio; Sexual Harassment and Assault at Work: Understanding the Costs; Closing the Gender Gap in Patenting, Innovation, and Commercialization: Programs Promoting Equity and Inclusion; and Undervalued and Underpaid in America: Women in Low-Wage, Female-Dominated Jobs. Prior to joining IWPR in August of 2012, Elyse received her Masters of International Relations from American University’s School of International Service, where she studied peace and conflict. She was awarded a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Bryn Mawr College.

As States Eye Texas-Style Abortion Bans, Economic Costs to Bottom Line and Women are High

Implementing abortion bans in target states like Texas could cost local economies nearly $20 billion and hurt women’s earnings and labor force participation.

Stronger Together: Union Membership Boosts Women’s Earnings and Economic Security

In every state, unionized women out earn women in non-union jobs—an essential wage advantage that would increase women’s economic security following the pandemic-induced “she-cession.” This brief shares insights on the ways unions narrow gender wage gaps and improve economic security for all women.

Climbing the Leadership Ladder: Women’s Progress Stalls

What prevents women from reaching the highest rungs of the leadership ladder? This report seeks to answer this by taking a closer look at the representation of women in management and leadership positions across the United States—and the barriers that hold organizations back from achieving full gender and racial equity in leadership.

By |2021-08-09T12:47:51-04:00August 9, 2021|Publications, Report|0 Comments

Tackling the Gender and Racial Patenting Gap to Drive Innovation: Lessons from Women’s Experiences

Tackling the Gender and Racial Patenting Gap to Drive Innovation: Lessons from Women’s Experiences shows the challenges women face in patenting process and provides recommendations to diversify innovation. The report highlights experiences of inventors and barriers to entry across fields and the unique difficulties women inventors—and particularly women inventors of color—face throughout the innovation and patenting process. The authors make recommendations on how to get more women and women of color in the pipeline. These include tackling systemic racial and gender bias and discrimination, investing in child care and work-life balance supports, and increasing support and funding for accelerator programs for women.

Before the “She-Cession”: A Pre-Pandemic Snapshot Shows More Women in the Workforce than Ever

The “she-cession” caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has created economic instability for women across the United States. Yet, before the COVID-19 pandemic, women’s employment and earnings were improving nationwide. It is important to track trends in women’s employment and earnings prior to the pandemic [...]

Narrow the Gender Pay Gap, Reduce Poverty for Families: The Economic Impact of Equal Pay by State

Equal pay would significantly reduce poverty for working women and their families across the United States.  If working women received equal pay with comparable men—men who are of the same age, have the same level of education, work the same number of hours, and have the same urban/rural status—poverty for working women would be reduced by more than 40 percent.

Building a Better Future for Women in New Orleans Post COVID-19: Opportunities for Women in Skilled Trade and Technical Jobs

Women in New Orleans are particularly severely affected by COVID-19 related job losses because they are more likely than men to work in leisure and hospitality and tourism. Women are much less likely than men to work in construction, manufacturing, transportation, and Port-related jobs,

‘Campaigning While Female’ and Other Aspects of Women’s Political Participation this Election Day

The year 2020 has been momentous and unprecedented in many ways, but one of the most profound shifts has been the influx of women into politics.

By |2020-11-03T17:59:29-04:00November 3, 2020|In the Lead|0 Comments

Stepping Up to Lead: Women Re-Shaping America’s Leadership, Politics & Priorities

Women comprise more than 50 percent of the U.S. population but currently hold just 23 percent of elected seats in Congress and about 1 in 3 state legislative seats. In 2018, a record number of women were elected to office—117 women, including 42 women of color—bringing their expertise, diverse experiences, and agenda for broad and inclusive change to Congress and state legislatures across the country.

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