Briefing Paper

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Women and the Care Crisis: Valuing In-Home Care in Policy and Practice

The paper suggests that to improve the quality of in-home care jobs, address the industry’s anticipated labor shortage, and ensure that high-quality care is available in the United States, it is necessary to increase the value attributed to care work through critical changes in public policies and practices. These changes would benefit not only the women and men who are care workers or recipients, but also the nation overall. As a sector in which job growth is especially rapid, the care industry is integral to the U.S. economy; as a result, any changes that help to fill the gap in this industry and improve conditions for its workforce will strengthen the nation’s economy as a whole.

By |2021-05-07T14:10:25-04:00June 11, 2020|Briefing Paper, Publications|Comments Off on Women and the Care Crisis: Valuing In-Home Care in Policy and Practice

Child Care Supports For The Construction Trades: Building and Sustaining Diversity in Oregon

The construction industry in Oregon is booming. Employment has grown steadily since 2010 and is now higher than during the pre-recession boom (Simonson 2019b). Yet, meeting demand is difficult for many companies. In a recent survey, close to 90 percent of construction industry employers in Oregon

By |2021-01-28T08:51:29-04:00May 26, 2020|Briefing Paper, Job Quality and Income Security|Comments Off on Child Care Supports For The Construction Trades: Building and Sustaining Diversity in Oregon

Gender Political Parity in the U.S. Congress: Women Will Wait 88 Years before Achieving Equal Representation

DOWNLOAD REPORT Women are a vital and integral [...]

By |2020-11-03T17:35:15-04:00March 5, 2020|Briefing Paper, IWPR|Comments Off on Gender Political Parity in the U.S. Congress: Women Will Wait 88 Years before Achieving Equal Representation

Women-Owned Businesses Have Increased in Number, but Still Face Obstacles to Growth

Women have made considerable progress in increasing their representation among business owners in recent years. The number of women-owned businesses increased in almost every industry between 2002 and 2012, at rates higher than those of men-owned businesses.

By |2020-07-26T17:12:18-04:00February 19, 2020|Briefing Paper, Employment and Earnings|Comments Off on Women-Owned Businesses Have Increased in Number, but Still Face Obstacles to Growth

Integrating Workforce Development Programs and Pregnancy Prevention Services

This briefing paper explores the availability of and need for pregnancy prevention services among individuals enrolled in job training in the United States.

By |2020-08-10T02:44:53-04:00February 13, 2020|Briefing Paper, Center on the Economics of Reproductive Health|Comments Off on Integrating Workforce Development Programs and Pregnancy Prevention Services

Growing the Numbers of Women in the Trades: Building Equity and Inclusion through Pre-Apprenticeship Programs

Greater access to apprenticeships in the skilled trades can help women achieve economic security and fill predicted skills shortages in construction. The construction trades provide good careers with family sustaining earnings.

By |2020-07-26T17:48:43-04:00November 14, 2019|Briefing Paper, Employment and Earnings|Comments Off on Growing the Numbers of Women in the Trades: Building Equity and Inclusion through Pre-Apprenticeship Programs

Women of Color in Economics and Sociology: Poor Climate, Unequal Treatment, and Lack of Legitimacy

A recent survey by the American Economics’ Association (AEA), for example, revealed widespread gender and racial discrimination in the field, with nearly half of women reporting unequal treatment, including sexual harassment and failure to take their work seriously (American Economic Association 2019).

By |2020-08-10T03:21:09-04:00August 6, 2019|Briefing Paper, Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Economy|Comments Off on Women of Color in Economics and Sociology: Poor Climate, Unequal Treatment, and Lack of Legitimacy

Access to Paid Sick Time in Bernalillo County, New Mexico

Approximately 35 percent of workers living in Bernalillo County, New Mexico, lack paid sick time, and among those, low-income and part-time workers are especially unlikely to be covered. Access to paid sick time promotes safe and healthy work environments by reducing the spread of illness[1] and preventing workplace injuries.

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