Center on the Economics of Reproductive Health

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Fast Facts: Pregnancy in the Workplace and the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act (PWFA)

Passing the PWFA would mean a step towards workplace gender equity, healthy pregnancies, reduced health disparities, and the economic security of pregnant and parenting women and their families.

Serving the Sexual and Reproductive Health Needs of Community College Students: Promising Practices to Promote Student Success

Sexual and reproductive health and well-being plays a central role in the lives of young adults. The report describes existing gaps in service provision and highlights a range of practices that can be replicated and scaled up to expand access for community college students.

Integrating Workforce Development Programs and Pregnancy Prevention Services

This briefing paper explores the availability of and need for pregnancy prevention services among individuals enrolled in job training in the United States.

By |2020-08-10T02:44:53+00:00February 13, 2020|Briefing Paper, Center on the Economics of Reproductive Health|Comments Off on Integrating Workforce Development Programs and Pregnancy Prevention Services

Improving Success in Higher Education through Increased Access to Reproductive Health Services

Pregnancy and childbearing have implications for a number of economic and social outcomes, including educational attainment (Sonfield et al. 2013). Yet young people are often left without the knowledge and tools to make informed reproductive health decisions. The majority of adolescents and young adults are sexually active but many hold incorrect or limited information about how to effectively avoid unintended pregnancies.

By |2020-07-26T02:09:02+00:00January 31, 2020|Center on the Economics of Reproductive Health, Student Parent Success Initiative|Comments Off on Improving Success in Higher Education through Increased Access to Reproductive Health Services

The Economic Effects of Contraceptive Access: A Review of the Evidence

Deciding whether and when to have a child is central to a woman’s economic well-being. It has implications for continuing education and joining the workforce, which can affect other long-term economic outcomes. As threats to abortion access increase and widen existing disparities, it is crucial to examine the range of economic effects that can result from this changing landscape.

By |2020-08-10T02:47:08+00:00September 26, 2019|Center on the Economics of Reproductive Health, Report|Comments Off on The Economic Effects of Contraceptive Access: A Review of the Evidence

The Economic Effects of Contraceptive Access: A Review of the Evidence (Fact Sheet)

Deciding whether and when to have a child is central to a woman’s economic well-being. It has implications for continuing education and joining the workforce, which can affect other long-term economic outcomes. As threats to abortion access increase and widen existing disparities, it is crucial to examine the range of economic effects that can result from this changing landscape.

By |2020-08-10T02:47:06+00:00September 26, 2019|Center on the Economics of Reproductive Health, Fact Sheet|Comments Off on The Economic Effects of Contraceptive Access: A Review of the Evidence (Fact Sheet)

The Economic Effects of Abortion Access: A Review of the Evidence (Fact Sheet)

Deciding whether and when to have a child is central to a woman’s economic well-being. It has implications for continuing education and joining the workforce, which can affect other long-term economic outcomes. As threats to abortion access increase and widen existing disparities, it is crucial to examine the range of economic effects that can result from this changing landscape.

By |2020-08-10T02:49:48+00:00July 18, 2019|Center on the Economics of Reproductive Health, Fact Sheet|Comments Off on The Economic Effects of Abortion Access: A Review of the Evidence (Fact Sheet)

The Economic Effects of Abortion Access: A Review of the Evidence

Deciding whether and when to have a child is central to a woman’s economic well-being. It has implications for continuing education and joining the workforce, which can affect other long-term economic outcomes. As threats to abortion access increase and widen existing disparities, it is crucial to examine the range of economic effects that can result from this changing landscape.

By |2020-08-10T02:49:45+00:00July 18, 2019|Center on the Economics of Reproductive Health, Fact Sheet|Comments Off on The Economic Effects of Abortion Access: A Review of the Evidence