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THE GENDER WAGE GAP BY OCCUPATION, RACE, AND ETHNICITY 2020

In 2020, women earned less than men in almost all occupations, whether they worked in predominantly male, predominantly female, or more integrated occupations. In the lowest paid of the largest 20 occupations for women, Maids and Housekeepers ($503 per week), women are nine-in-ten workers (and face a wage gap of 10.6 percent); in the highest paid of the largest 20 occupations for men, Chief Executives ($2,402 per week), women are fewer than one-in-three workers (and face a wage gap of 24.4 percent).

Gender Wage Gap Shrinks in 2020 Due to Tremendous Job Losses for Lowest Paid – Racial and Ethnic Disparities Persist

Washington, DC – A new policy brief, The Weekly Gender Wage Gap by Race and Ethnicity: 2020 from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), provides the first data on COVID-19’s impact on the gender wage gap. It finds that the wage gap narrowed, but reasons for the change point to growing inequality instead of progress for women. Women’s average earnings increased more than men’s because lowest paid women were the most likely to lose jobs during the COVID-19 shecession – and are no longer counted in the average women’s weekly median earnings.  As a result of the missing lowest-paid women, the gender wage gap narrowed, between all women and men, and between women and men by race and ethnicity.

By |2021-03-08T03:13:57-04:00March 4, 2021|Press Releases|0 Comments

THE WEEKLY GENDER WAGE GAP BY RACE AND ETHNICITY: 2020

As lowest paid women lost most jobs, the gender wage gap for full-time workers shrank for all women and men, and by race & ethnicity. The gender wage gap in weekly earnings for full-time workers in the United States narrowed between 2019 and 2020, from 19.5 percent in 2019 (a gender earnings ratio of 81.5%) to 18.7 percent in 2020 (a gender earnings ratio of 82.3%)

Latina Equal Pay Day Highlights a Vicious Cycle: COVID-19 and the Gender Wage Gap

Today, on Latina Equal Pay Day, we are encouraged to think critically about the gender wage gap and the challenges Latina women face in the labor market.

By |2020-11-02T17:41:35-04:00October 29, 2020|In the Lead|0 Comments

Same Gap, Different Year. The Gender Wage Gap: 2019 Earnings Differences by Gender, Race, and Ethnicity

The rate of progress toward closing the gender pay gap did not increase in 2019. If the pace of change in the annual earnings ratio continues at the same rate as it has since 1960, it will take another 39 years, until 2059, for men and women to reach parity.1 This projection for equal pay has remained unchanged for the past four years.

The Workforce Investment Act and Women’s Progress: Does WIA Funded Training Reinforce Sex Segregation in the Labor Market and the Gender Wage Gap?

The Workforce Investment Act of 1998 (WIA) is the primary basis for federally funded workforce development. One of its stated purposes it to “increase the employment, retention and earnings of participants…”1 While earnings data suggest that both men and women benefit from WIA services, average earnings among women who received WIA services are significantly lower than average earnings for men.

By |2020-11-24T00:05:30-04:00June 11, 2020|IWPR|Comments Off on The Workforce Investment Act and Women’s Progress: Does WIA Funded Training Reinforce Sex Segregation in the Labor Market and the Gender Wage Gap?
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