COVID-19 and Recovery Response2022-03-09T14:54:59-04:00

COVID-19 and Recovery Response

As the pandemic enters its third year and the nation turns to recovery, the Institute for Women’s Policy Research is committed to amplifying and addressing the challenges women face. IWPR’s new research provides insights and recommendations for policymakers to help meet the urgent and long-term needs of women, their families, and their communities.

Prioritizing Student Parents
Prioritizing Student Parents in COVID-19 Response and Relief

This briefing paper outlines how state and federal policymakers can center the immediate and longerterm needs of student parents in policy responses to the pandemic, so that they are able to safeguard their families’ economic well-being and continue along their pathway to college attainment.

Breadwinner Mothers
Holding Up Half the Sky: Mothers as Workers, Primary Caregivers, & Breadwinners During COVID-19

The loss of jobs in sectors dominated by women will have a devastating impact of families, especially those headed by single mothers or where women are the primary or co-breadwinner. One in two of more than 30 million families in the U.S. with children under the age of 18 have a breadwinner mother, who contributes at least 40 percent of the earnings to the household.

6.9 below pre crisis
Halting Recovery Leaves Women’s Unemployment in Double Digits, and Women’s Payroll Employment Still 6.9 Million Below Pre-Crisis Levels
Food Insecurity
Decline in Household Income During Pandemic Contributes to Food Insufficiency
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Despite modest employment gains, women still 5.5 million jobs below pre-pandemic level. Unemployment for Black and Hispanic women remains high.

New October jobs data show women remain 5.5 million jobs below February's levels. Despite women gaining 280,000 (43.9 percent) of 638,000 new non-farm payroll jobs since October and adult women having lower unemployment rates (6.5 percent) than men (6.7 percent) for the first time since April, stubborn trends continue.

By |November 6, 2020|Press Releases|

Summit Focuses Equity Lens on Student Parent Success

By Dynahlee Padilla The experiences of student parents pursuing a college education amid the COVID-19 pandemic was the focus of Thursday’s Achieving the Dream Student Parent Success Summit. A number of leaders, speakers and attendees across all disciplines at educational institutions and community-based organizations participated in the five-hour Summit, providing equitable recommendations to develop campus programs/policies that support student parents. Data at Ascend via the Aspen Institute — a national hub that supports children and the adults in their lives [...]

By |November 5, 2020|Press Hits|

Three Ways to Build on the Families First Coronavirus Response Act

Three Ways to Build On the Families First Coronavirus Response Act A new study in the journal Health Affairs this week, “COVID-19 Emergency Sick Leave Significantly Reduced US COVID-19 Cases”, finds that the emergency paid leave in the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) reduced the number of COVID-19 cases. Between mid-March (FFCRA was enacted on March 18) and the end of May, an average of 400 cases per day in each state were averted by providing a new right [...]

By |October 20, 2020|In the Lead|

‘If We Had a Panic Button, We’d be Hitting it.’ Women Are Exiting the Labor Force En Masse—And That’s Bad For Everyone

The United States is in the midst of a crushing economic recession, COVID-19 infection rates are spiking, and thousands of schools and childcare facilities have yet to reopen in-person classrooms. The group bearing the brunt of this torrent of bad news? Women.

By |October 17, 2020|Press Hits|

Women Are Deciding Not to Have Babies Because of the Pandemic. That’s Bad for All of Us

BY ELIANA DOCKTERMAN When women leave work—even for just a year, as many mothers are considering now—their long-term earning potential plummets. The Institute for Women’s Policy Research conducted a study that found the earnings over time of women who took just a year off work between 2001 and 2015 were 39% lower than those of women who didn’t take time off. The exit of large numbers of women from the workforce is bad not just for individual women and their families. It’s bad [...]

By |October 15, 2020|Press Hits|
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