Jeff Hayes, Ph.D.

Home/Jeff Hayes

About Jeff Hayes

Jeff Hayes is a sociologist and Scholar in Residence at American University and works on research examining women’s and men’s employment, job quality, and economic security over the life course, including retirement. He currently oversees IWPR’s work analyzing usage and cost of paid family and medical leave in the United States and provides technical assistance to several states and localities considering how they might improve workers’ access to paid leave for their own health needs or to care for family members. Dr. Hayes has been interviewed on paid leave, income security, and job quality issues in The Washington Post, MarketWatch, Huffington Post, CNN Money, CNBC, and other outlets around the country. Dr. Hayes has testified on the costs of paid leave proposals before the New York City Council, the DC city council, and the Maryland House Economic Matters committee. He is currently serving on the Maryland Task Force to Study Family and Medical Leave Insurance. He served on the Commission to Modernize Social Security and has provided technical assistance to members of the US Congress on including credits for caregiving in Social Security. Dr. Hayes is a member of the National Academy of Social Insurance. As an experienced survey researcher, Dr. Hayes advises on IWPR’s survey work and conducts major surveys such as the IWPR/Rockefeller Survey of Economic Security. Prior to joining IWPR, Dr. Hayes worked at the McGill Institute for Health and Social Policy and the Harvard Project on Global Working Families, analyzing how labor conditions affect children’s health and development around the world, and taught research methods at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He holds Master’s and Ph.D. degrees in Sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and a Bachelor’s degree in Sociology and Religious Studies from the University of Virginia.

The Costs and Benefits of Paid Sick Days: Testimony of Jeffrey A. Hayes, Ph.D., Before the Civil Service and Labor Committee of the New York City Council regarding Proposed Int. No. 97-A: The “Earned Sick Time Act”

The current proposed bill states that workers in businesses with fewer than five employees will receive job protection for up to five unpaid sick days and workers in businesses with five or more employees will be able to earn up to five paid sick days per year.

By |2021-02-07T19:21:48-04:00March 22, 2013|IWPR|Comments Off on The Costs and Benefits of Paid Sick Days: Testimony of Jeffrey A. Hayes, Ph.D., Before the Civil Service and Labor Committee of the New York City Council regarding Proposed Int. No. 97-A: The “Earned Sick Time Act”

Job Growth and Unemployment for Men and Women in Pennsylvania, 2007 to 2011

Since the beginning of the Great Recession in December of 2007 both women and men in Pennsylvania have experienced dramatic job losses and steep increases in unemployment.

By |2020-11-29T23:37:09-04:00September 4, 2012|IWPR|Comments Off on Job Growth and Unemployment for Men and Women in Pennsylvania, 2007 to 2011

A Clearer View of Poverty: How the Supplemental Poverty Measure Changes Our Perceptions of Who Is Living in Poverty

In response to concerns about the adequacy of the official federal poverty measure, a new Supplemental Poverty Measure was recently developed to more accurately assess poverty.

By |2020-11-15T00:01:36-04:00July 30, 2012|IWPR|Comments Off on A Clearer View of Poverty: How the Supplemental Poverty Measure Changes Our Perceptions of Who Is Living in Poverty

Retirement on the Edge: Women, Men, and Economic Insecurity After the Great Recession

The IWPR/Rockefeller Survey addressed the extent of economic security almost a year and a half after the recession officially ended. Many of the survey’s findings are detailed in the report, Women and Men Living On the Edge: Economic Insecurity After the Great Recession (Hayes and Hartmann 2011).

Women and Men Living on the Edge: Economic Insecurity After the Great Recession

The IWPR/Rockefeller Survey of Economic Security, like several other recent surveys, finds that the effects of the 2007–2009 recession, known as the Great Recession, are both broad and deep. The IWPR/Rockefeller survey shows that more than one and a half years after the recession came to an official end, and the recovery supposedly began, many women and men report that they are still suffering significant hardships.

By |2020-09-25T15:12:31-04:00September 30, 2011|Report|0 Comments

The Union Advantage in Wireline Telecommunications for African-Americans, Hispanics, and Women

Jobs in the wired telecommunications industry traditionally provide excellent opportunities to African–American, Hispanic, and women nonsupervisory workers

By |2020-12-19T16:59:44-04:00August 12, 2011|IWPR|Comments Off on The Union Advantage in Wireline Telecommunications for African-Americans, Hispanics, and Women

The Right Call: Breastfeeding Accommodations under the Affordable Care Act

The 2010 Affordable Care Act (ACA) breastfeeding protections establish the rights of new mothers who are nonexempt employees to reasonable break times and private space to express breast milk at work until a child is one year of age.

By |2020-12-14T02:20:51-04:00May 30, 2011|IWPR|Comments Off on The Right Call: Breastfeeding Accommodations under the Affordable Care Act
Go to Top