Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and the Economy2022-03-23T13:26:05-04:00

Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and the Economy

IWPR’s Program on Race, Ethnicity, Gender and the Economy conducts original research and policy analysis using intersectional and racial equity frameworks to better understand the experiences of women of color, their families and communities in the economy and society.

Throughout the year, we organize convenings, symposia, and roundtables with national leaders, scholars, and practitioners and other key stakeholders on issues related to race, ethnicity, gender and the economy.

Status of Black Women
The Status of Black Women in the United States

The report aims to amplify the historical and current contributions of Black domestic workers to the broader domestic worker movement. Using available data, the report describes the experiences of millions of Black women across the United States, and offers recommendations where the opportunities for Black women can be realized.

Black Automation
Digitalization, Automation, and Older Black Women: Ensuring Equity in the Future of Work

Despite their high labor force participation, Black women have historically been concentrated in a small number of occupations with low pay and poor working conditions.

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Breadwinner Mothers by Race/Ethnicity and State

With the large majority of U.S. mothers in the labor force and a steady decline in the real earnings of all workers over recent decades, families are increasingly relying on mothers’ earnings for economic stability. In the United States, half of all households with children under 18 have a breadwinner mother, who is either a single mother who heads a household, irrespective of earnings, or a married mother who provides at least 40 percent of the couple’s joint earnings.

By |September 8, 2016|

Black Women Are Among Those Who Saw the Largest Declines in Wages over the Last Decade

Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of data from the American Community Survey finds that between 2004 and 2014, Black women’s real median annual earnings for full-time, year-round work declined by 5.0 percent—more than three times as much as women’s earnings overall.

By |August 22, 2016|

Get to the Bricks: The Experiences of Black Women from New Orleans Public Housing After Hurricane Katrina

Get to the Bricks: The Experiences of Black Women from New Orleans Public Housing After Hurricane Katrina presents the results of qualitative research conducted with 184 low-income black women who lived in public housing prior to Hurricane Katrina and the flooding of New Orleans, and who were displaced by the hurricane and the closure and demolition of their housing.

By |August 25, 2015|
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