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Raises and Recognition: Secretaries, Clerical Workers and the Union Wage Premium

Though secretarial and clerical occupations were not always female intensive, they are currently the largest women's occupational category in the US.

By |2021-02-19T01:19:53-04:00April 1, 1990|IWPR|Comments Off on Raises and Recognition: Secretaries, Clerical Workers and the Union Wage Premium

Low-Wage Work, Health Benefits, and Family Well-Being

Departing from the outmoded view that only male breadwinners need earn a wage adequate to support a family, a study by IWPR examines the adequacy of wages and benefits of all adult workers for family support.

By |2020-11-25T03:06:30-04:00March 1, 1990|IWPR|Comments Off on Low-Wage Work, Health Benefits, and Family Well-Being

The Importance of Health Benefits in the Telecommunications Industry

This Briefing Paper is one of a series of occasional papers by the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) on the status of women workers in the communications and other service industries.

By |2020-12-12T20:11:45-04:00August 1, 1989|IWPR|Comments Off on The Importance of Health Benefits in the Telecommunications Industry

Mothers, Children, and Low-Wage Work: The Ability to Earn a Family Wage

The most frequently mentioned cause of the feminization of poverty is the change in family structure-thee increase in divorce, nonmarital births, and independent households established by women (McLanahan et al. 1989; Pearce 1989).

By |2020-11-14T00:56:26-04:00August 1, 1989|IWPR|Comments Off on Mothers, Children, and Low-Wage Work: The Ability to Earn a Family Wage

Unnecessary Losses: Costs to Americans in the States of the Lack of Family and Medical Leave

Despite widespread agreement that employment policies should be responsive to the needs of working families, Congress is currently engaged in debate about a national leave policy that would require minimum protections against job loss because of family and medical needs.

By |2020-11-15T00:43:00-04:00August 1, 1989|IWPR|Comments Off on Unnecessary Losses: Costs to Americans in the States of the Lack of Family and Medical Leave
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