Lindsey Reichlin Cruse, M.A.

About Lindsey Reichlin Cruse

Lindsey Reichlin is a Study Director at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. Lindsey manages IWPR’s grant-funded projects under the Student Parent Success Initiative (SPSI), which promotes access to and success in college for women who are parents of dependent children. She also contributes to IWPR’s research on global women’s issues, including conducting case studies for a study funded by the International Finance Corporation on private sector provision of child care supports. Lindsey has presented IWPR research at numerous events and conferences, including serving as a panelist on private sector strategies to promote work-family balance at UNDP’s Third Global Forum on Business for Gender Equality in Panama City. An expert on access to postsecondary education, Lindsey has been quoted in several outlets including The Washington Post, the National Journal, and Market Watch. Prior to joining IWPR, Lindsey held positions at the Aspen Institute’s Global Leaders Council for Reproductive Health and at Global Policy Solutions in Washington, D.C. Lindsey has a Masters of International Affairs from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, where she studied human rights, and a Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles.

Supportive Services in Job Training and Education: A Research Review

This report presents findings from a review and analysis of literature on the importance, effectiveness, and availability of support services for participants in job training programs in the United States.

By Cynthia Hess, Ph.D., Yana Mayayeva, Lindsey Reichlin Cruse and Mala Thakur|2020-12-31T00:58:04-05:00November 25, 2016|IWPR|Comments Off on Supportive Services in Job Training and Education: A Research Review

Child Care for Parents in College: A State-by-State Assessment

Child care is a crucial support for the 4.8 million parents in college, but it is difficult for students to find and afford.

By Eleanor Eckerson, Lindsey Reichlin Cruse, Mary Sykes, Elizabeth Noll, Barbara Gault and Lauren Talbourdet|2020-12-31T00:28:41-05:00September 1, 2016|IWPR|Comments Off on Child Care for Parents in College: A State-by-State Assessment

The Role of the Federal Child Care Access Means Parents in School (CCAMPIS) Program in Supporting Student Parent Success

Affordable, quality child care is crucial to the postsecondary success of the 4.8 million undergraduate students raising dependent children.

By Lindsey Reichlin Cruse, Barbara Gault and Mary Sykes|2020-12-20T17:27:19-05:00February 29, 2016|IWPR|Comments Off on The Role of the Federal Child Care Access Means Parents in School (CCAMPIS) Program in Supporting Student Parent Success

Reproductive Health and Women’s Educational Attainment: Women’s Funds’ Strategies to Improve Outcomes for Women

This paper offers an overview of the significance and status of access to reproductive health rights and services in the United States today.

By Lindsey Reichlin Cruse and Justine Augeri|2020-12-02T01:57:52-05:00October 7, 2015|IWPR|Comments Off on Reproductive Health and Women’s Educational Attainment: Women’s Funds’ Strategies to Improve Outcomes for Women

Research & Policy Update: Student Parents & Access to Child Care at Community Colleges

Power Point presentation from Student Parent Support Symposium session on "Current Student Parent Research & Policy Efforts"

4.8 Million College Students are Raising Children

Over a quarter (26 percent) of all undergraduate students, or 4.8 million students, are raising dependent children. Women are disproportionately likely to be balancing college and parenthood, many without the support of a spouse or partner.

By Barbara Gault, Lindsey Reichlin Cruse, Elizabeth Reynolds and Meghan Froehner|2020-09-09T17:12:46-05:00November 17, 2014|Fact Sheet, Student Parent Success Initiative|Comments Off on 4.8 Million College Students are Raising Children

Campus Child Care Declining Even As Growing Numbers of Parents Attend College

Affordable, reliable child care is a crucial support for the 4.8 million college students raising dependent children, but is often tough to find. High child care costs, difficulty obtaining subsidies, and scheduling challenges often create significant obstacles for student parents, and may contribute to their relatively low rates of college completion.

By Barbara Gault, Lindsey Reichlin Cruse, Elizabeth Reynolds and Meghan Froehner|2020-12-14T05:47:23-05:00November 17, 2014|IWPR|Comments Off on Campus Child Care Declining Even As Growing Numbers of Parents Attend College
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