Program Director, Employment and Earnings

Areas of Expertise: Access to Good Jobs, Automation & Future of Work, Family & Medical Leave, Flexible Work & Fair-Scheduling, International Women's Status and Rights, Job Training Success, Pay Equity & Discrimination, Unemployment & the Economy, Women in Unions, Workforce Development & Job Training

Ariane Hegewisch is Program Director of Employment and Earnings at IWPR and Scholar in Residence at American University; prior to that she spent two years at IWPR as a scholar-in-residence. She came to IWPR from the Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings. She is responsible for IWPR’s research on workplace discrimination and is a specialist in comparative human resource management, with a focus on policies and legislative approaches to facilitate greater work life reconciliation and gender equality, in the US and internationally. Prior to coming to the USA she taught comparative European human resource management at Cranfield School of Management in the UK where she was a founding researcher of the Cranet Survey of International HRM, the largest independent survey of human resource management policies and practices, covering 25 countries worldwide. She started her career  in local economic development, developing strategies for greater gender equality in employment and training in  local government in the UK. She has published many papers and articles and co-edited several books, including ‘Women, work and inequality: The challenge of equal pay in a deregulated labour market”. She is German and has a BSc in Economics from the London School of Economics and an MPhil in Development Studies from the IDS, Sussex.

Publications

Gender Inequality, Work Hours, and the Future of Work

Executive Summary Gender differences in paid and unpaid time at work are an important aspect of gender inequality. Women tend to spend more time on unpaid household and family care work, and men spend more time in paid work. This unequal distribution of time creates barriers to women’s advancement at work and reduces women’s economic…

The Future of Care Work: Improving the Quality of America’s Fastest-Growing Jobs

Executive Summary Paid adult care work jobs are expected to increase substantially in the coming years, due to both an aging population and a comparatively low risk of automation for many of these jobs. These jobs, however, are among the lowest quality occupations in the U.S. labor market, with paid adult care workers facing low…

The Gender Wage Gap: 2018; Earnings Differences by Gender, Race, and Ethnicity

The ratio of women’s and men’s median annual earnings was 81.6 percent for full-time, year-round workers in 2018, a statistically insignificant change from 2017 when it was 81.7 percent.[1] This ratio means that the gender wage gap for full-time, year-round workers is 18.4 percent. Women’s median full-time, year-round earnings in 2018 were $45,097, compared with…

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation 2018

Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women. Data for both women’s and men’s median weekly earnings for full-time work are available for 125 occupations.[1] The occupation…

Women Gain Jobs in Construction Trades but Remain Underrepresented in the Field

Between 2017 and 2018, the number of women working in construction trades increased by 17.6 percent, rising to well over a quarter of a million women (276,000).[1] This is substantially higher than job growth of 3.7 percent in construction occupations overall (Figure 1).   Figure 1. Women’s Job Gains Outpace Overall Job Growth in Construction…

Retail Occupations: Few Signs of Employment Decline but Increasing Precarity

This publication is an excerpt from IWPR's comprehensive report, Women, Automation, and the Future of Work.   One in eleven U.S. workers work in retail jobs, close to 13 million workers in 2014-16. Occupations in the retail sector include Retail Salespersons, Cashiers, and Stock Clerks and Order Fillers, but also Advertising Agents, Telemarketers, and Models…

Women, Automation, and the Future of Work

Read the full report Read the executive summary   INTRODUCTION Why the Analysis of Technological Change Needs a Gender Perspective Automation, artificial intelligence, and other technological changes are already affecting the number and quality of jobs. The number of workers employed in brick and mortar retail stores has fallen while the number employed in fulfillment…

The Gender Wage Gap: 2018 Earnings Differences by Race and Ethnicity

The gender wage gap in weekly earnings for full-time workers in the United States widened between 2017 and 2018. In 2018, the ratio of women’s to men’s median weekly full-time earnings was 81.1 percent, a decrease of 0.7 percent since 2017, when the ratio was 81.8 percent, leaving a wage gap of 18.9 percent, compared…