Program Director, Employment and Earnings

Areas of Expertise: Access to Good Jobs, Family & Medical Leave, Flexible Work & Fair-Scheduling, International Women's Status and Rights, Job Training Success, Pay Equity & Discrimination, Women in Unions, Workforce Development & Job Training

Ariane Hegewisch has been a researcher at IWPR since the summer of 2008; prior to that she spent two years at IWPR as a scholar-in-residence. She came to IWPR from the Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings. She is responsible for IWPR’s research on workplace discrimination and is a specialist in comparative human resource management, with a focus on policies and legislative approaches to facilitate greater work life reconciliation and gender equality, in the US and internationally. Prior to coming to the USA she taught comparative European human resource management at Cranfield School of Management in the UK where she was a founding researcher of the Cranet Survey of International HRM, the largest independent survey of human resource management policies and practices, covering 25 countries worldwide. She started her career  in local economic development, developing strategies for greater gender equality in employment and training in  local government in the UK. She has published many papers and articles and co-edited several books, including ‘Women, work and inequality: The challenge of equal pay in a deregulated labour market”. She is German and has a BSc in Economics from the London School of Economics and an MPhil in Development Studies from the IDS, Sussex.

Publications

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation 2016; and by Race and Ethnicity

Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women. Data for both women’s and men’s median weekly earnings for full-time work are available for 120 occupations.[1] The occupation…

The Gender Wage Gap 2016: Earnings Differences by Race and Ethnicity

The gender wage gap for weekly full-time workers in the United States narrowed slightly between 2015 and 2016. In 2016, the ratio of women’s to men’s median weekly full-time earnings was 81.9 percent, an increase of 0.8 percentage points since 2015, when the ratio was 81.1 percent, leaving a wage gap of 18.1 percentage points…

Supportive Services in Workforce Development Programs: Administrator Perspectives on Availability and Unmet Needs

Report Summary Although program administrators confirm that supportive services must supplement skills training, budget constraints often leave participants with unmet needs.    Workforce development programs offer much-needed skills training to un- and under-employed Americans.  Many such individuals also face personal challenges that prevent them from completing their training.  Workforce professionals have long asserted that supportive…

Undervalued and Underpaid in America: Women in Low-Wage, Female-Dominated Jobs

This report investigates women’s experiences in large, low-wage, growing, female-dominated occupations, comparing demographic data and indicators of economic security between 1994 and 2014, and projecting growth rates to 2024. It focuses on 22 occupations fitting these criteria, and analyzes these jobs’ size and wages, racial and ethnic composition, share of parents and single parents, workers’…

Five Ways to Win an Argument about the Gender Wage Gap

The 79.6 percent wage ratio figure, the most commonly used figure to measure the gender wage gap in the United States, is often derided as misleading, a myth, or worst of all, a lie. In this post, we argue that the figure is an accurate measure of the inequality in earnings between women and men…

The Gender Wage Gap: 2015; Annual Earnings Differences by Gender, Race, and Ethnicity

The ratio of women’s and men’s median annual earnings was 79.6 percent for full-time/year-round workers in 2015. This means the gender wage gap for full-time/year-round workers is 20.4 percent. The ratio of women’s and men’s median annual earnings did not improve significantly during the last year, and has not seen a statistically significant annual increase…

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation 2015 and by Race and Ethnicity

Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women. Data for both women’s and men’s median weekly earnings for full-time work are available for 119 occupations. Across occupations…

Pathways to Equity: Narrowing the Wage Gap by Improving Women’s Access to Good Middle-Skill Jobs

This report addresses women’s access to well-paid, growing, middle-skill jobs (jobs that do not require a bachelor’s degree). It documents sex segregation in middle-skill jobs, and discusses how gender integration of good jobs could both reduce skill-shortages and improve women’s economic security. The report focuses on middle-skilled “target” occupations in manufacturing, information technology, and transportation,…

The Gender Wage Gap: 2015; Earnings Differences by Race and Ethnicity

The gender wage gap for weekly full-time workers in the United States widened between 2014 and 2015. The median weekly earnings for full-time work increased for both women and men during 2015, but the increase was more substantial for men than women. In 2015, the ratio of women’s to men’s median weekly full-time earnings was…

The Gender Wage Gap and Public Policy

Women’s earnings are crucial to their families’ economic well-being. Women are close to half of all employees in the United States, they are half of all workers with college degrees, and they are the co- or main breadwinners in close to two thirds of families with children,1 yet they persistently earn less than men. Whether…