SWS – Political Participation2021-09-20T00:30:50-04:00

Political  Participation

Shaping their own future

When women participate in the political process, they shape policies in ways that reflect their interests and needs. The Status of Women in the States’ Political Participation Index looks at women as voters, grassroots activists and campaign fundraisers, and officeholders and examines the uneven progress they have made.

Explore the Data

The Political Participation Index measures women’s political participation through four key indicators. Each state is ranked and graded based on their performance on these four measures.

Women in Elected Office
Average Percent of Women Who Registered to Vote, 2016 and 2018
Average Percent of Women Who Voted, 2016 and 2018
Women’s Institutional Resources Index

Political Participation Rank and Score by State

Articles and Publications

The Gender Pay Gap, 1985 to 2020—with Forecast for Achieving Pay Equity, by Race and Ethnicity

If progress continue at the same rate as it has since 1985, it will take until 2059 to reach full pay equity between all women and men workers.

Lost Jobs, Stalled Progress: The Impact of the “She-Cession” on Equal Pay

In year one of COVID-19, the gender wage gap narrowed slightly only for full-time, year-round workers, with women in low-paying jobs bearing the brunt of the crisis. For all workers, the gender gap widened slightly.

The Gender Pay Gap, 1960 to 2020—with Forecast for Achieving Pay Equity

If progress continues at the same rate as it has since 1960, it will still take another 39 years, until 2059, to reach full equity between women and men among full-time, year-round workers.

By |September 13, 2021|Economic, Security, Mobility, and Equity, Publications, Quick Figure|

As States Eye Texas-Style Abortion Bans, Economic Costs to Bottom Line and Women are High

Implementing abortion bans in target states like Texas could cost local economies nearly $20 billion and hurt women’s earnings and labor force participation.

A Decade with No Improvement: Native Women and the Wage Gap

Native American and Alaska Native women are paid less than White men in all states with sufficient sample sizes—with little progress towards equity over the last decade.

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