Intersections of Domestic Violence and Economic Security

Asha DuMonthier, Malore Dusenbery, M.A.

October 19, 2016
  • ID: IWPR #B362

Domestic and dating violence, or intimate partner violence (IPV), is an unfortunately common reality that has short- and long-term negative effects on survivors’ economic security, and independence. Over one quarter (27.3 percent) of women in the United States have experienced sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime, compared with 11.5 percent of men (Breiding et al. 2014). Survivors’ economic needs often drive them to stay with abusers longer, leading to increased economic abuse, injuries, and even fatalities (Washington State Domestic Violence Fatality Review 2012). In fact, 74 percent of survivors report staying with an abuser for economic reasons (Mary Kay Foundation 2012).