Cost of State Level Abortion Restrictions2021-04-20T21:31:29-04:00

Reproductive Health and Women’s Economic Opportunity

Women who cannot access abortion are 3 times more likely to leave the workforce and 4 times more likely to have a household income below the federal poverty level than women who were able to access abortion when needed.

Women in states with better access to contraception have higher rates of labor force participation, more frequently pursue full-time work, have higher median wages, and experience better job mobility relative to women in states with poor contraceptive access.

In states with strong abortion protections and coverage, women have higher levels of education, lower levels of poverty, and experience a higher ratio of female-to-male earnings.

Highlighted National Data Set

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Below you will find an interactive map.  Please navigate the map by clicking the state you wish to learn more about and then select the “view state data” button to see detailed data and statistics.

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In 2019, Hidden Value: The Business Case for Reproductive Health illuminated the link between access to reproductive health care and business performance and documented for the first time in a robust way why and how access to comprehensive reproductive health care is important to a company’s bottom line.

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In 2019, Hidden Value: The Business Case for Reproductive Health illuminated the link between access to reproductive health care and business performance and documented for the first time in a robust way why and how access to comprehensive reproductive health care is important to a company’s bottom line.

Hidden Value: The Business Case for Reproductive Health

In 2019, Hidden Value: The Business Case for Reproductive Health illuminated the link between access to reproductive health care and business performance and documented for the first time in a robust way why and how access to comprehensive reproductive health care is important to a company’s bottom line.

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