SWS – Work and Family2021-09-17T16:12:41-04:00

Work and Family

The equal participation of women in politics and government is integral to building strong communities and a vibrant democracy in which women and men can thrive. By voting, running for office, and engaging in civil society as leaders and activists, women shape laws, policies, and decision-making in ways that reflect their interests and needs, as well as those of their families and communities.

Today, women constitute a powerful force in the electorate and inform policymaking at all levels of government. Yet, women continue to be underrepresented in governments across the nation and face barriers that often make it difficult for them to exercise political power and assume leadership positions in the public sphere. This chapter presents data on several aspects of women’s involvement in the political process in the United States: voter registration and turnout, female state and federal elected and appointed representation, and state-based institutional resources for women. It examines how women fare on these indicators of women’s status, the progress women have made and where it has stalled, and how racial and ethnic disparities compound gender disparities in specific forms of political participation.

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Score by State – Graph
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Political Participation Rank and Score by State

In Our Own Backyards: Local and State Strategies to Improve the Quality of Family Child Care

Th is report examines state and local policies and programs designed to improve the quality of family child care. For the purposes of this report, family child care is defined as a provider caring for two or more unrelated children in the provider’s home.

By |April 14, 2005|Report|

The Price of School Readiness: A Tool for Estimating the Cost of Universal Preschool in the States

DOWNLOAD REPORT Families and communities throughout the United States are embracing early childhood education as an important and beneficial experience for children. Policymakers are beginning to view children’s access to early education as a public good, and are debating ideas such as universal [...]

By |February 29, 2004|Report|

Still a Man’s Labor Market: The Long-Term Earnings Gap

Although the wage gap, measured by conventional methods, has narrowed in the last several decades, with women who work full-time full-year now earning 77 percent of what men earn (compared with 59 cents on the male dollar 40 years ago), its sweeping effects are largely unacknowledged because its measurement is limited to a single year and restricted to only a portion of the workforce. When accumulated over many years for all men and women workers, the losses to women and their families due to the wage gap are large and can be devastating.

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