Publications

Women’s Access to Health Insurance: Executive Summary

The Institute's study analyzes data from the January and March 1991 Current Population Surveys, monthly surveys conducted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. The study focuses on adult women of working age, 18 to 64, examines the factors affecting their access to health insurance, and assesses the impact of the proposed Health Security Act…

Women's Access to Health Insurance: Excerpts

Overall, women are more likely than men to have insurance coverage. Our findings show that in 1990, 15 percent of women between the ages of 18 and 64, or 12 million women, are uninsured compared to 19 percent, or 14 million men. Women are less likely to have insurance through their own employers (direct employer-based…

Women’s Access to Health Insurance

Women have a unique relationship to the health care system in the United States that needs to be taken into account in health care reform. Compared with men, women use more health care services and pay more for them as a proportion of their income. They are also responsible for facilitating their families' use of…

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation and by Race and Ethnicity, 2013

Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women. Data for both women’s and men’s median weekly earnings for full-time work are available for 112 occupations ; there…

Pay Equity and Women's Wage Increases: Success in the States, A Model for the Nation

Published in the Duke Journal of Gender Law & Policy By 1989, twenty states had implemented programs to raise the wages of workers in female-dominated job classes in their state civil services. A study of these pay equity programs, conducted by the Institute for Women's Policy Research and the Urban Institute, found that all twenty…