Publications

Welfare to Work: The Job Opportunities of AFDC Recipients

In a frenzy to move welfare recipients off the roles through budget cuts, block grants, time limits, cries to "end welfare as we know it," and attempts to exclude children and young mothers from coverage, little attention has been paid to what works to help current AFDC recipients find work and earn wages that will…

Women’s Access to Health Insurance: Executive Summary

The Institute's study analyzes data from the January and March 1991 Current Population Surveys, monthly surveys conducted by the U.S. Bureau of the Census. The study focuses on adult women of working age, 18 to 64, examines the factors affecting their access to health insurance, and assesses the impact of the proposed Health Security Act…

Welfare That Works: The Working Lives of AFDC Recipients

In the latest campaign to move recipients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) off the welfare rolls through time-limiting benefits and ending entitlements, little attention has been paid to what will work to increase the likelihood that AFDC recipients can find work and earn wages above the barest minimum. In Welfare that Works:…

Exploring the Characteristics of Self-Employment and Part-Time Work Among Women

The quality of jobs created during the 1980s-- and whether these were "good" jobs or "bad" jobs-- has been the source of a highly charged debate. The quality of jobs is of increasing importance to women as their financial responsibility for themselves and their families has grown, and they have been seeking employment opportunities at…

Increasing Working Mothers’ Earnings

Previous research on both the earnings of working mothers and the poverty of women-maintained families has employed a sex-segregated model that focuses on family-related characteristics to explain women's low wages or their inferior economic position. These family-related characteristics include such variables as marital status, presence of a full-time working spouse, and number and ages of…

Who Needs a Family Wage? The Implications of Low-Wage Work For Family Well-Being

Wage levels and health insurance are two of the most important employer policies affecting the well-being of families. Some researchers have concluded that the proportion of jobs paying wages high enough to support a family and with fringe benefits such as health insurance have declined. The results of this decline in better paying jobs have…

Women's Access to Health Insurance: Excerpts

Overall, women are more likely than men to have insurance coverage. Our findings show that in 1990, 15 percent of women between the ages of 18 and 64, or 12 million women, are uninsured compared to 19 percent, or 14 million men. Women are less likely to have insurance through their own employers (direct employer-based…

Women’s Access to Health Insurance

Women have a unique relationship to the health care system in the United States that needs to be taken into account in health care reform. Compared with men, women use more health care services and pay more for them as a proportion of their income. They are also responsible for facilitating their families' use of…

Restructuring Work: How Have Women and Minority Managers Fared?

Have the employment opportunities of women and minorities been negatively impacted as a result of corporate and industrial restructuring? A new Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) study, The Impact of the Glass Ceiling and Structural Change on Minorities and Women examines how changes in the workplace in the 1970s and 1980s affected women and…

Exploring the Characteristics of Self-Employment and Part-Time Work Among Women

The quality of jobs created during the 1980s-- and whether these were "good" jobs or "bad" jobs-- has been the source of a highly charged debate. The quality of jobs is of increasing importance to women as their financial responsibility for themselves and their families has grown, and they have been seeking employment opportunities at…