President and CEO

Areas of Expertise: Access to Good Jobs, Civic & Political Engagement, Family & Medical Leave, Pay Equity & Discrimination, Poverty and the Social Safety Net, Racial & Ethnic Inequality, Reproductive Health & Rights, Retirement & Social Security, The Status of Women and Girls, Unemployment & the Economy, Women and Asset-Building, Women in Unions

Heidi Hartmann is the President of the Washington-based Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR), a scientific research organization that she founded in 1987 to meet the need for women-centered, policy-oriented research. Dr. Hartmann is also a Distinguished Economist In-Residence for Gender and Economic Analysis at American University and serves as the Editor of the Journal of Women, Politics & Policy.

Dr. Hartmann lectures internationally on women, economics, and public policy; frequently testifies before the U.S. Congress; and is often cited as an authority in various media outlets, such as CNN, ABC News, The New York Times, and PBS NewsHour. She has published numerous articles in journals and books and her work has been translated into more than a dozen languages. She is a co-author of several IWPR reports, including Women’s and Men’s Employment and Unemployment in the Great Recession; Still A Man’s Labor Market: The Long-Term Earnings Gap; Unnecessary Losses: Costs to Americans of the Lack of Family and Medical Leave; Equal Pay for Working Families, and Strengthening Social Security for Women. She served as Chair of the Board of the American Academy of Political Science, and Treasurer of the National Council of Women’s Organizations.

Prior to founding IWPR, Dr. Hartmann was on the faculties of Rutgers University and the New School for Social Research and worked at the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. In 1994, Dr. Hartmann was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship Award for her work in the field of women and economics. She is an economist with a B.A. from Swarthmore College and M. Phil and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University, all in economics. She is the recipient of two honorary degrees. She was named a Charlotte Perkins Gilman Fellow by the American Academy of Political and Social Science in 2014, and in 2017 she received the Distinguished Career Award from the American Sociological Association.

Publications

Comment on 2020 Census Federal Register Notice

August 7, 2018   Jennifer Jessup Departmental Paperwork Clearance Officer Department of Commerce 14th and Constitution Avenue NW, Room 6616 Washington, DC 20230 Re: USBC-2018-0005-0001, 2020 Census Federal Register Notice   Dear Ms. Jessup:   The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) writes to express its concern over proposed changes to the 2020 Census. IWPR…

Estimating the Cost of Paid Family and Medical Leave in Connecticut

The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analyzed Connecticut SB-1, An Act Concerning Earned Family and Medical Leave, to estimate its likely annual use and cost. IWPR, together with economists Randy Albelda (University of Massachusetts) and Alan Clayton-Matthews (Northeastern University) developed and updated a simulation model to estimate the usage and costs of family and…

Wage Gap Will Cost Millennial Women $1 Million Over their Careers

Millennial women are the most educated generation of women in the United States and are now more likely than men to have a college degree. At the same time, progress on closing the gender wage gap has stalled for nearly two decades, indicating that unequal pay continues to be a challenge to new generations of…

Decline in Retail Jobs Felt Entirely by Women

Men gained retail jobs over the last year, despite overall job loss in the industry   The Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of the December employment report from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) establishment survey finds that, over the last year (November 2016 - November 2017), women gained fewer jobs than…

Five Ways to Win an Argument about the Gender Wage Gap (Updated 2018)

(Updated September 13, 2018) The 80.5 percent wage ratio figure, the most commonly used figure to measure the gender wage gap in the United States, is often derided as misleading, a myth, or worst of all, a lie. In this post, we argue that the figure is an accurate measure of the inequality in earnings…

The Impact of Equal Pay on Poverty and the Economy

Women make up almost half of the workforce, yet they continue to earn less than men on average in nearly every single occupation for which there is sufficient earnings data for both men and women to calculate an earnings ratio (Hegewisch and DuMonthier 2016a). In 2015, women working full-time, year-round earned just 80 cents for…