Senior Research Scientist

Areas of Expertise: Access to Good Jobs, Health & Well-Being, Hurricane Katrina & the Gulf Coast, Poverty and the Social Safety Net, Racial & Ethnic Inequality, The Status of Women and Girls, Violence & Safety

Chandra Childers is a Senior Research Scientist at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. An expert on social stratification and social and economic inequality by race and sex, Chandra examines issues related to women and girls of color and job quality.

In addition to being cited in the press, including The Nation and The Atlantic, Chandra has given presentations on the findings of IWPR research reports at various policy conferences.

Before joining IWPR Chandra taught multiple undergraduate courses in Sociology at Texas Tech University and the University of Washington. Courses taught include Social Problems, Poverty & Inequality, and Research Practicum. Chandra completed her Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Washington. Her dissertation examined trends in racial occupational segregation by sex.

Publications

Black and Hispanic Women Lag in Recovering from the Recession

Unemployment among Young Women Before and After the Recession by Age, Race, and Ethnicity   The year 2017 marks a decade since the start of the Great Recession, which ran from December 2007 to June 2009.[i] According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, persons are counted as unemployed only if they do not have a…

Executive Summary: The Status of Black Women in the United States

In collaboration with the National Domestic Workers Alliance, IWPR has released a comprehensive report in the longstanding report series, The Status of Women in the States. This is the executive summary of the report. It aims to amplify the historical and current contributions of Black domestic workers to the broader domestic worker movement. Using available data, the…

The Status of Black Women in the United States

In collaboration with the National Domestic Workers Alliance, IWPR has released a comprehensive report in the longstanding report series, The Status of Women in the States. The report aims to amplify the historical and current contributions of Black domestic workers to the broader domestic worker movement. Using available data, the report describes the experiences of…

High School Girls and Violence 2015: A Chartbook

This chartbook focuses on an area often ignored in discussions about the well-being of girls generally, and girls of color in particular—the alarming proportion of high school girls experiencing physical and sexual violence at the hands of schoolmates, friends, family members, and dating partners. This violence has long-term effects on girls’ lives, including degraded physical…

The Status of Women in the South

The Status of Women in the South builds on IWPR’s long-standing analyses and reports, The Status of Women in the States, that have provided data on the status of women nationally and for all 50 states plus the District of Columbia since 1996. The Status of Women in the South uses data from U.S. government…

Moynihan’s Half Century: Have We Gone to Hell in a Hand Basket?

In The Negro Family: The Case for National Action, published in 1965, Daniel Patrick Moynihan famously argued that the fundamental obstacle to racial equality was the instability of Black families, and especially the prevalence of single-mother families. That same year, he predicted that the spread of single-parent families would result not only in rising poverty…

Toward Our Children’s Keeper: A Data-Driven Analysis of the Interim Report of the My Brother’s Keeper Initiative Shows the Shared Fate of Boys and Girls of Color

This report was commissioned by the African American Policy Forum (AAPF) as part of a series highlighting issues confronting women and girls of color. This report uses information and data provided by the My Brother’s Keeper Task Force interim report (MBK90) and website in addition to other scholarly research to analyze the validity of the…