Publications

Intersections of Stalking and Economic Security

Stalking affects nearly one in six women and more than one in 19 men in the United States in their lifetime. The majority of stalking victims are stalked by individuals they know. Two-thirds (66.2 percent) of female victims report that the stalker was a former intimate partner. Common stalking tactics–including physical surveillance, unwanted phone calls, other unwanted…

High School Girls and Violence 2015: A Chartbook

This chartbook focuses on an area often ignored in discussions about the well-being of girls generally, and girls of color in particular—the alarming proportion of high school girls experiencing physical and sexual violence at the hands of schoolmates, friends, family members, and dating partners. This violence has long-term effects on girls’ lives, including degraded physical…

Intersections of Domestic Violence and Economic Security

Domestic and dating violence, or intimate partner violence (IPV), is an unfortunately common reality that has short- and long-term negative effects on survivors’ economic security, and independence. Over one quarter (27.3 percent) of women in the United States have experienced sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner in their lifetime, compared with…

The Gender Wage Gap: 2015; Annual Earnings Differences by Gender, Race, and Ethnicity

The ratio of women’s and men’s median annual earnings was 79.6 percent for full-time/year-round workers in 2015. This means the gender wage gap for full-time/year-round workers is 20.4 percent. The ratio of women’s and men’s median annual earnings did not improve significantly during the last year, and has not seen a statistically significant annual increase…

Native American Women Saw the Largest Declines in Wages over the Last Decade among All Women

Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of data from the American Community Survey finds that between 2004 and 2014, Native American women’s real median annual earnings for full-time, year-round work declined by 5.8 percent—more than three times as much as women’s earnings overall (Figure 1). Like Native American women, Black women and Hispanic women…

Black Women Are Among Those Who Saw the Largest Declines in Wages over the Last Decade

Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) analysis of data from the American Community Survey finds that between 2004 and 2014, Black women’s real median annual earnings for full-time, year-round work declined by 5.0 percent—more than three times as much as women’s earnings overall. Like Black women, Native American women and Hispanic women also saw their…

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation 2015 and by Race and Ethnicity

Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women. Data for both women’s and men’s median weekly earnings for full-time work are available for 119 occupations. Across occupations…

The Gender Wage Gap: 2015; Earnings Differences by Race and Ethnicity

The gender wage gap for weekly full-time workers in the United States widened between 2014 and 2015. The median weekly earnings for full-time work increased for both women and men during 2015, but the increase was more substantial for men than women. In 2015, the ratio of women’s to men’s median weekly full-time earnings was…

The Status of Women in the South

The Status of Women in the South builds on IWPR’s long-standing analyses and reports, The Status of Women in the States, that have provided data on the status of women nationally and for all 50 states plus the District of Columbia since 1996. The Status of Women in the South uses data from U.S. government…