Jessica Milli, Ph.D.

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About Jessica Milli

Jessica Milli is a Study Director at IWPR and Scholar in Residence at American University. She oversees IWPR’s work on paid sick days, providing technical assistance to dozens of communities across the country exploring paid sick days policies. In addition, Jessica leads IWPR research projects on breastfeeding and women in patenting. Jessica has presented her work at events around the country and has testified before state and local legislative bodies on IWPR’s research. She has been interviewed in Bloomberg, The Atlantic, Fast Company, Marketplace, The Nation, TIME, ABC News, Fortune, and other national and regional outlets. Prior to joining IWPR, Jessica taught economics courses ranging from principles of microeconomics and economic statistics, to game theory and labor economics at several institutions including UW-Milwaukee, UW-Whitewater, and Randolph College. Jessica received her Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. During her studies, she applied her focus of Labor Economics to relationships within households and what economic factors put women at more risk of experiencing domestic violence. Her dissertation analyzed the complex relationship between domestic violence and various measures of women’s socioeconomic status, such as welfare receipt and employment.

The Status of Women in the South

The Status of Women in the South builds on IWPR’s long-standing analyses and reports, The Status of Women in the States, that have provided data on the status of women nationally and for all 50 states plus the District of Columbia since 1996. The Status of Women in the South uses data from U.S. government and other sources to analyze women’s status in the southern United States, including Alabama, Arkansas, the District of Columbia, Florida Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.

By |2020-08-10T04:19:31-04:00February 25, 2016|Report, Status of Women|Comments Off on The Status of Women in the South

The Status of Women in the States: 2015

The Status of Women in the States: 2015 provides critical data to identify areas of progress for women in states across the nation and pinpoint where additional improvements are still needed. It presents hundreds of data points for each state across seven areas that affect women’s lives: political participation, employment and earnings, work and family, poverty and opportunity, reproductive rights, health and well-being, and violence and safety.

By |2020-08-26T23:23:39-04:00May 20, 2015|Report, Status of Women|Comments Off on The Status of Women in the States: 2015

The Status of Women in Washington: Forging Pathways to Leadership and Economic Opportunity

This report provides critical data and analyzes areas of progress for women in Washington, as well as places where progress has slowed or stalled.

By |2021-01-23T01:55:14-04:00March 3, 2015|IWPR|Comments Off on The Status of Women in Washington: Forging Pathways to Leadership and Economic Opportunity

Valuing Good Health in Maryland: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Sick Days

This briefing paper uses data collected by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the U.S. Census Bureau to evaluate the costs and benefits of Maryland’s Earned Sick Days Act.

By |2020-11-30T23:47:40-04:00January 28, 2015|IWPR|Comments Off on Valuing Good Health in Maryland: The Costs and Benefits of Earned Sick Days

Access to Paid Sick Days in Oregon

An analysis by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR) finds that approximately 47 percent of private sector workers living in Oregon lack even a single paid sick day (these figures exclude workers in Portland and Eugene, which both have paid sick days ordinances).

By |2020-11-16T00:51:59-04:00January 16, 2015|IWPR|Comments Off on Access to Paid Sick Days in Oregon

Paid Sick Time Access in Minnesota Varies by County of Residence

Paid sick time brings substantial benefits to employers, workers, families, and communities including promoting safe and healthy work environments by reducing the spread of illness and workplace injuries, reducing health care costs, and supporting children and families by helping parents to fulfill their caregiving responsibilities.

By |2020-11-15T03:30:09-04:00September 23, 2014|IWPR|Comments Off on Paid Sick Time Access in Minnesota Varies by County of Residence
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