Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D.

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About Heidi Hartmann

Heidi Hartmann is the President Emerita and Senior Research Economist at the Washington-based Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), a scientific research organization that she founded in 1987 to meet the need for women-centered, policy-oriented research. Dr. Hartmann is also a Distinguished Economist In-Residence for Gender and Economic Analysis at American University and serves as the Editor of the Journal of Women, Politics & Policy. Dr. Hartmann lectures internationally on women, economics, and public policy; frequently testifies before the U.S. Congress; and is often cited as an authority in various media outlets, such as CNN, ABC News, The New York Times, and PBS NewsHour. She has published numerous articles in journals and books and her work has been translated into more than a dozen languages. She is a co-author of several IWPR reports, including Women’s and Men’s Employment and Unemployment in the Great Recession; Still A Man’s Labor Market: The Long-Term Earnings Gap; Unnecessary Losses: Costs to Americans of the Lack of Family and Medical Leave; Equal Pay for Working Families, and Strengthening Social Security for Women. She served as Chair of the Board of the American Academy of Political Science, and Treasurer of the National Council of Women’s Organizations. Prior to founding IWPR, Dr. Hartmann was on the faculties of Rutgers University and the New School for Social Research and worked at the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. In 1994, Dr. Hartmann was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship Award for her work in the field of women and economics. She is an economist with a B.A. from Swarthmore College and M. Phil and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University, all in economics. She is the recipient of two honorary degrees. She was named a Charlotte Perkins Gilman Fellow by the American Academy of Political and Social Science in 2014, and in 2017 she received the Distinguished Career Award from the American Sociological Association.

The Women of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast: Multiple Disadvantages and Key Assets for Recovery Part I. Poverty, Race, Gender and Class

This Briefing Paper, the first in a two-part series addressing the needs of the women of the Gulf Coast region, uncovers the multiple disadvantages experienced by women who lived in the areas affected by both the hurricanes, Katrina and Rita, and in many of the communities to which the evacuees are moving.

By |2020-11-12T06:07:00-04:00September 30, 2005|IWPR|Comments Off on The Women of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast: Multiple Disadvantages and Key Assets for Recovery Part I. Poverty, Race, Gender and Class

The Status of Women in Your County: A Community Research Tool

This tool is a joint project of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research and the James A. & Faith Knight Foundation, to build capacity among community groups to assess and track the status of women in their regions.

By |2021-06-13T20:39:13-04:00November 30, 2004|IWPR|Comments Off on The Status of Women in Your County: A Community Research Tool

Assessing the Status of Women at the County Level: A Manual for Researchers and Advocates

This manual provides instructions for analyzing the status of women at the county level. The manual allows advocates, researchers, and others within each state to assess women’s status at the local level, rank counties, and make cross-county comparisons.

By |2020-11-13T03:54:34-04:00October 19, 2004|IWPR|Comments Off on Assessing the Status of Women at the County Level: A Manual for Researchers and Advocates

Expanded Sick Leave Would Yield Substantial Benefits to Business, Employers, and Families

More than half of all workers in the private sector and in state and local government (54 percent, or 66 million workers) are not provided with any paid sick leave after a full year of service, according to a new analysis of U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research.

By |2020-12-02T04:20:41-04:00June 15, 2004|IWPR|Comments Off on Expanded Sick Leave Would Yield Substantial Benefits to Business, Employers, and Families

Still a Man’s Labor Market: The Long-Term Earnings Gap

Although the wage gap, measured by conventional methods, has narrowed in the last several decades, with women who work full-time full-year now earning 77 percent of what men earn (compared with 59 cents on the male dollar 40 years ago), its sweeping effects are largely unacknowledged because its measurement is limited to a single year and restricted to only a portion of the workforce. When accumulated over many years for all men and women workers, the losses to women and their families due to the wage gap are large and can be devastating.

The Impact of Disabilities on Mothers’ Work Participation: Examining Differences between Single and Married Mothers

This study examines the prevalence of disabilities among mothers and children and analyzes how these disabilities influence mothers’ work participation.

By |2021-01-07T02:56:04-04:00January 31, 2004|IWPR|Comments Off on The Impact of Disabilities on Mothers’ Work Participation: Examining Differences between Single and Married Mothers

The Gender Wage Gap: Progress of the 1980s Fails to Carry Through

The gender wage gap is much narrower now than it was at the start of the revolutionary decade of the 1960s, when long-standing barriers to women’s educational achievement and employment success began to be dismantled and the first of a series of critical equal employment opportunity standards were enacted by Congress.

By |2021-01-31T19:21:11-04:00October 31, 2003|IWPR|Comments Off on The Gender Wage Gap: Progress of the 1980s Fails to Carry Through

Survival at the Bottom: The Income Packages of Low-Income Families with Children

This study builds on previous IWPR work and provides information on the income packaging strategies and outcomes for a variety of low-income families with children in the United States during a time period prior to the welfare reform legislation of 1996.

By |2020-12-02T23:15:00-04:00May 31, 2003|IWPR|Comments Off on Survival at the Bottom: The Income Packages of Low-Income Families with Children

Social Security: The Largest Source of Income for Both Women and Men in Retirement

This Briefing Paper examines major sources of income for older Americans—earnings, Social Security pensions and assets—by gender and marital status.

By |2020-11-15T17:45:14-04:00March 31, 2003|IWPR|Comments Off on Social Security: The Largest Source of Income for Both Women and Men in Retirement
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