Heidi Hartmann, Ph.D.

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About Heidi Hartmann

Heidi Hartmann is the President Emerita and Senior Research Economist at the Washington-based Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), a scientific research organization that she founded in 1987 to meet the need for women-centered, policy-oriented research. Dr. Hartmann is also a Distinguished Economist In-Residence for Gender and Economic Analysis at American University and serves as the Editor of the Journal of Women, Politics & Policy. Dr. Hartmann lectures internationally on women, economics, and public policy; frequently testifies before the U.S. Congress; and is often cited as an authority in various media outlets, such as CNN, ABC News, The New York Times, and PBS NewsHour. She has published numerous articles in journals and books and her work has been translated into more than a dozen languages. She is a co-author of several IWPR reports, including Women’s and Men’s Employment and Unemployment in the Great Recession; Still A Man’s Labor Market: The Long-Term Earnings Gap; Unnecessary Losses: Costs to Americans of the Lack of Family and Medical Leave; Equal Pay for Working Families, and Strengthening Social Security for Women. She served as Chair of the Board of the American Academy of Political Science, and Treasurer of the National Council of Women’s Organizations. Prior to founding IWPR, Dr. Hartmann was on the faculties of Rutgers University and the New School for Social Research and worked at the National Research Council/National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. In 1994, Dr. Hartmann was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship Award for her work in the field of women and economics. She is an economist with a B.A. from Swarthmore College and M. Phil and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University, all in economics. She is the recipient of two honorary degrees. She was named a Charlotte Perkins Gilman Fellow by the American Academy of Political and Social Science in 2014, and in 2017 she received the Distinguished Career Award from the American Sociological Association.

Measuring the Costs of Domestic Violence Against Women and the Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions: An Initial Assessment and Proposals for Further Research

This review paper was prepared by the Institute for Women's Policy Research (IWPR) as part of a joint project with Victim Services, Inc. and the Domestic Violence Training Project.

By |2020-12-22T23:49:20-04:00April 20, 1997|IWPR|Comments Off on Measuring the Costs of Domestic Violence Against Women and the Cost-Effectiveness of Interventions: An Initial Assessment and Proposals for Further Research

A Feminist Perspective on the Federal Budget: A Summary

The economic gap between women and men- the wage gap, the gap in occupational representation, the gap in the amount of time spent caring for family members and doing housework - is slowly closing.

By |2021-01-07T03:25:19-04:00July 19, 1996|IWPR|Comments Off on A Feminist Perspective on the Federal Budget: A Summary

Contingent Work: Its Consequences for Well-Being, The Gendered Division of Labor, and the Welfare State

Since the mid 1980s, labor market researchers have become increasingly convinced that the United States is witnessing a restructuring of the labor market.

By |2020-12-20T17:53:11-04:00August 1, 1995|IWPR|Comments Off on Contingent Work: Its Consequences for Well-Being, The Gendered Division of Labor, and the Welfare State

The Economic Impact of Contingent Work on Women and Their Families

Since the mid 1980s, many labor market researchers have become increasingly convinced that the U.S. is witnessing a restructuring of the labor market.

By |2020-12-20T18:59:43-04:00August 1, 1995|IWPR|Comments Off on The Economic Impact of Contingent Work on Women and Their Families

Welfare That Works: The Working Lives of AFDC Recipients

In the latest campaign to move recipients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) off the welfare rolls through time-limiting benefits and ending entitlements, little attention has been paid to what will work to increase the likelihood that AFDC recipients can find work and earn wages above the barest minimum.

By |2020-12-23T00:42:05-04:00March 1, 1995|IWPR|Comments Off on Welfare That Works: The Working Lives of AFDC Recipients

Pay Equity and Women’s Wage Increases: Success in the States, A Model for the Nation

By 1989, twenty states had implemented programs to raise the wages of workers in female-dominated job classes in their state civil services.

By |2020-11-25T01:53:16-04:00October 1, 1994|IWPR|Comments Off on Pay Equity and Women’s Wage Increases: Success in the States, A Model for the Nation

The Clinton Round: An Analysis of the Impact of Current Proposals to “Free” Single Mothers from Welfare Dependence

Since its beginnings, there has been heated public debate about whether AFDC should be a relatively ungenerous stop-gap program, or an anti-poverty program specifically designed to meet the needs of families headed by single women.

By |2020-11-15T17:27:56-04:00August 8, 1994|IWPR|Comments Off on The Clinton Round: An Analysis of the Impact of Current Proposals to “Free” Single Mothers from Welfare Dependence
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