Elyse Shaw, M.A.

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About Elyse Shaw

Elyse Shaw is a Study Director at the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. Elyse directs IWPR’s projects on the Status of Women in the United States, women’s political participation, and those related to women and girls of color, which examines the intersectional nature of race and gender on women’s lives. Elyse also works extensively on workforce development and job training initiatives and contributes to IWPR’s research on global women’s issues, including providing technical assistance to the United Nations Education, Scientific, and Cultural Organization on the establishment of a gender policy institute in Palestine. Elyse has presented IWPR research on numerous webinars, panels, and to visiting international thought leaders and has provided commentary on a broad range of research topics. She has been quoted in several local and national outlets including The Washington Post and Public Radio International. She authored or co-authored several publications, including Assets for Equity: Building Wealth for Women in Central Ohio; Sexual Harassment and Assault at Work: Understanding the Costs; Closing the Gender Gap in Patenting, Innovation, and Commercialization: Programs Promoting Equity and Inclusion; and Undervalued and Underpaid in America: Women in Low-Wage, Female-Dominated Jobs. Prior to joining IWPR in August of 2012, Elyse received her Masters of International Relations from American University’s School of International Service, where she studied peace and conflict. She was awarded a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science from Bryn Mawr College.

Sexual Harassment and Assault at Work: Understanding the Costs

Through a review of the current literature on sexual harassment and assault, this briefing paper highlights how workplace sexual harassment and assault affect women’s economic advancement and security, and the costs of these harms to employers (including estimates of financial losses where available). It also provides recommendations for preventing sexual harassment and reducing the negative effects of harassment for individuals and workplaces.

Closing the Gender Gap in Patenting, Innovation, and Commercialization: Programs Promoting Equity and Inclusion

This report profiles programs designed to increase gender diversity in patenting, innovation, and entrepreneurship in a variety of settings, including academic institutions, corporations, and government and nonprofit organizations.

By |2020-10-28T18:55:38+00:00July 24, 2018|IWPR|Comments Off on Closing the Gender Gap in Patenting, Innovation, and Commercialization: Programs Promoting Equity and Inclusion

The Union Advantage for Women

Labor unions deserve credit for many of the workplace policies that Americans now take for granted—a 40-hour work week, a minimum wage, pay for overtime, and protections from health and safety hazards—and the labor movement continues to champion state and local policies such as paid sick days and paid family leave, policies that are beneficial to all working women and families.

Women’s Committees: A Key to Recruiting and Retaining Women Apprentices

Read about how women’s committees are supporting recruitment and retention of women in apprenticeship.

By |2020-11-23T22:53:25+00:00January 1, 2018|IWPR|Comments Off on Women’s Committees: A Key to Recruiting and Retaining Women Apprentices

Massachusetts Supply and Demand Strategy: A Successful Model for Increasing Gender Diversity in the Trades

Read about how the Policy Group on Tradeswomen’s Issues and its partners have transformed opportunity for women in construction through a comprehensive supply and demand strategy.

By |2020-11-23T22:47:55+00:00January 1, 2018|IWPR|Comments Off on Massachusetts Supply and Demand Strategy: A Successful Model for Increasing Gender Diversity in the Trades

Undervalued and Underpaid in America: Women in Low-Wage, Female-Dominated Jobs

This report investigates women’s experiences in large, low-wage, growing, female-dominated occupations, comparing demographic data and indicators of economic security between 1994 and 2014, and projecting growth rates to 2024.

Girls and Young Women of Color: Where They Are in the United States

Of the 14.1 million girls and young women of color, age 10–24, in the United States, 40.7 percent (5,748,760) live in the South, 23.2 percent in the Pacific West, 14.9 percent in the Northeast, 10.4 percent in East North Central, 7.3 percent in the Mountain West, and 3.5 percent in West North Central, as shown in Map 1.

By |2020-09-09T17:05:22+00:00October 19, 2016|Briefing Paper, Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Economy|Comments Off on Girls and Young Women of Color: Where They Are in the United States

Women of Color: Where They Are in the United States

Of the 42.3 million women of color, age 18 and older, in the United States, 41.5 percent (17,537,563) live in the South, 23.2 percent in the Pacific West, 16.3 percent in the Northeast, 9.8 percent in East North Central, 6.4 percent in the Mountain West, and 2.9 percent in West North Central.

By |2020-09-09T17:09:42+00:00October 19, 2016|Briefing Paper, Race, Ethnicity, Gender, and Economy|Comments Off on Women of Color: Where They Are in the United States

The Status of Women in the South

The Status of Women in the South builds on IWPR’s long-standing analyses and reports, The Status of Women in the States, that have provided data on the status of women nationally and for all 50 states plus the District of Columbia since 1996. The Status of Women in the South uses data from U.S. government and other sources to analyze women’s status in the southern United States, including Alabama, Arkansas, the District of Columbia, Florida Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia, and West Virginia.

By |2020-08-10T04:19:31+00:00February 25, 2016|Report, Status of Women|Comments Off on The Status of Women in the South

Get to the Bricks: The Experiences of Black Women from New Orleans Public Housing After Hurricane Katrina

Get to the Bricks: The Experiences of Black Women from New Orleans Public Housing After Hurricane Katrina presents the results of qualitative research conducted with 184 low-income black women who lived in public housing prior to Hurricane Katrina and the flooding of New Orleans, and who were displaced by the hurricane and the closure and demolition of their housing.

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