Barbara Gault Ph.D.

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About Barbara Gault

Barbara Gault, Ph.D., is the former Executive Vice President of the Institute for Women’s Policy Research. Her work covers a wide range of issues, including college access and affordability, job quality, paid leave, poverty, political engagement, and the need for better early care and education options for working parents. She founded and lead IWPRs Student Parent Success Initiative, and has authored dozens of reports and publications, including Improving Child Care Access to Promote Postsecondary Success Among Low-Income Parents, Resilient and Reaching for More: Challenges and Benefits of Higher Education for Welfare Participants and Their Children, " and Working First But Working Poor: The Need for Education and Training Following Welfare Reform. She has testified in Congress on low-income women’s educational access, has spoken and delivered keynote presentations in venues throughout the country, and appears in a range of print, radio and television media outlets. Prior to joining IWPR, Dr. Gault conducted research at the Office of Children’s Health Policy Research, and served as a staff and board member of organizations promoting human rights in Latin America. She received her Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Pennsylvania and her B.A. from the University of Michigan. She serves on the Board of Directors of the Coalition on Human Needs, and is a Scholar in Residence at American University.

The Women of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast: Multiple Disadvantages and Key Assets for Recovery Part I. Poverty, Race, Gender and Class

This Briefing Paper, the first in a two-part series addressing the needs of the women of the Gulf Coast region, uncovers the multiple disadvantages experienced by women who lived in the areas affected by both the hurricanes, Katrina and Rita, and in many of the communities to which the evacuees are moving.

By |2020-11-12T06:07:00-04:00September 30, 2005|IWPR|Comments Off on The Women of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast: Multiple Disadvantages and Key Assets for Recovery Part I. Poverty, Race, Gender and Class

In Our Own Backyards: Local and State Strategies to Improve the Quality of Family Child Care

Th is report examines state and local policies and programs designed to improve the quality of family child care. For the purposes of this report, family child care is defined as a provider caring for two or more unrelated children in the provider’s home.

Assessing the Status of Women at the County Level: A Manual for Researchers and Advocates

This manual provides instructions for analyzing the status of women at the county level. The manual allows advocates, researchers, and others within each state to assess women’s status at the local level, rank counties, and make cross-county comparisons.

By |2020-11-13T03:54:34-04:00October 19, 2004|IWPR|Comments Off on Assessing the Status of Women at the County Level: A Manual for Researchers and Advocates

Expanded Sick Leave Would Yield Substantial Benefits to Business, Employers, and Families

More than half of all workers in the private sector and in state and local government (54 percent, or 66 million workers) are not provided with any paid sick leave after a full year of service, according to a new analysis of U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data by the Institute for Women’s Policy Research.

By |2020-12-02T04:20:41-04:00June 15, 2004|IWPR|Comments Off on Expanded Sick Leave Would Yield Substantial Benefits to Business, Employers, and Families

The Impact of Disabilities on Mothers’ Work Participation: Examining Differences between Single and Married Mothers

This study examines the prevalence of disabilities among mothers and children and analyzes how these disabilities influence mothers’ work participation.

By |2021-01-07T02:56:04-04:00January 31, 2004|IWPR|Comments Off on The Impact of Disabilities on Mothers’ Work Participation: Examining Differences between Single and Married Mothers

Building a Stronger Child Care Workforce: A Review of Studies of the Effectiveness of Public Compensation Initiatives

Child care providers are among the lowest paid workers in the United States. Inadequate compensation has led many qualified practitioners to leave the field for higher paying jobs, decreasing the quality of available care.

By |2020-11-22T23:30:46-04:00November 1, 2002|IWPR|Comments Off on Building a Stronger Child Care Workforce: A Review of Studies of the Effectiveness of Public Compensation Initiatives

Working First But Working Poor: The Need for Education & Training Following Welfare Reform

This report presents findings of an exploratory study about job training for low-income people, particularly women leaving welfare.

By |2020-12-12T21:18:36-04:00August 31, 2001|IWPR|Comments Off on Working First But Working Poor: The Need for Education & Training Following Welfare Reform
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