Ariane Hegewisch, M.Phil.

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About Ariane Hegewisch

Ariane Hegewisch is Program Director of Employment and Earnings at IWPR and Scholar in Residence at American University; prior to that she spent two years at IWPR as a scholar-in-residence. She came to IWPR from the Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings. She is responsible for IWPR’s research on workplace discrimination and is a specialist in comparative human resource management, with a focus on policies and legislative approaches to facilitate greater work life reconciliation and gender equality, in the US and internationally. Prior to coming to the USA she taught comparative European human resource management at Cranfield School of Management in the UK where she was a founding researcher of the Cranet Survey of International HRM, the largest independent survey of human resource management policies and practices, covering 25 countries worldwide. She started her career  in local economic development, developing strategies for greater gender equality in employment and training in  local government in the UK. She has published many papers and articles and co-edited several books, including ‘Women, work and inequality: The challenge of equal pay in a deregulated labour market”. She is German and has a BSc in Economics from the London School of Economics and an MPhil in Development Studies from the IDS, Sussex.

Quality Employment for Women in the Green Economy: Industry, Occupation, and State-by-State Job Estimates

This report provides the first-ever estimates of women’s employment in the green economy, state-by-state, by industry, and by occupation. The analysis draws on the U.S. Census Bureau’s American Community Survey; the Brookings-Battelle Clean Economy database; and the U.S. Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics Green Goods and Services survey.

The Status of Women in the Greensboro Metropolitan Area, North Carolina

Women in the Greensboro area, and in North Carolina as a whole, have made much progress during the last few decades. The majority of women work—many in professional jobs—and women are essential to the economic health of their communities.

By |2020-11-15T04:16:24-04:00January 6, 2013|IWPR|Comments Off on The Status of Women in the Greensboro Metropolitan Area, North Carolina

Job Growth and Unemployment for Men and Women in Pennsylvania, 2007 to 2011

Since the beginning of the Great Recession in December of 2007 both women and men in Pennsylvania have experienced dramatic job losses and steep increases in unemployment.

By |2020-11-29T23:37:09-04:00September 4, 2012|IWPR|Comments Off on Job Growth and Unemployment for Men and Women in Pennsylvania, 2007 to 2011

Key Findings on the Economic Status of Women in North Carolina

Women in North Carolina have made significant social and economic advances in recent decades, but the need for further progress remains. A forthcoming report from the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR), The Status of Women in North Carolina, shows that many of North Carolina’s women are vulnerable to challenges such as unemployment, a persistent wage gap, poverty, and the high cost of child care.

By |2020-09-09T17:13:55-04:00August 23, 2012|Fact Sheet, Status of Women|Comments Off on Key Findings on the Economic Status of Women in North Carolina

Ending Sex and Race Discrimination in the Workplace: Legal Interventions That Push the Envelope

This report draws on the IWPR/WAGE Consent Decree Database to analyze the injunctive relief awarded in 502 sex and/or race discrimination settlements that became effective between 2000 and 2008.

Maternity, Paternity, and Adoption Leave in the United States

The United States is among a very small number of countries in the world without a statutory right to paid maternity leave for employees. The Institute for Women’s Policy Research’s (IWPR) analysis of Working Mother magazine’s “100 Best Companies” finds that almost all of the top companies provide some paid maternity leave and, between 2006 and 2010, these employers dramatically expanded coverage for paternity and adoptive parent leave.

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation (April 2011)

The gender wage gap and occupational segregation – men primarily working in occupations done by other men, and women primarily working with other women – are persistent features of the US labor market.

By |2020-11-15T18:02:15-04:00April 10, 2011|IWPR|Comments Off on The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation (April 2011)

Ending Sex and Race Discrimination in the Workplace: Legal Interventions That Push the Envelope (Executive Summary)

This report draws on the IWPR/WAGE Consent Decree Database to analyze the injunctive relief awarded in 502 sex and/or race discrimination settlements that became effective between 2000 and 2008. (Executive Summary)

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