Ariane Hegewisch, M.Phil.

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About Ariane Hegewisch

Ariane Hegewisch is Program Director of Employment and Earnings at IWPR and Scholar in Residence at American University; prior to that she spent two years at IWPR as a scholar-in-residence. She came to IWPR from the Center for WorkLife Law at UC Hastings. She is responsible for IWPR’s research on workplace discrimination and is a specialist in comparative human resource management, with a focus on policies and legislative approaches to facilitate greater work life reconciliation and gender equality, in the US and internationally. Prior to coming to the USA she taught comparative European human resource management at Cranfield School of Management in the UK where she was a founding researcher of the Cranet Survey of International HRM, the largest independent survey of human resource management policies and practices, covering 25 countries worldwide. She started her career  in local economic development, developing strategies for greater gender equality in employment and training in  local government in the UK. She has published many papers and articles and co-edited several books, including ‘Women, work and inequality: The challenge of equal pay in a deregulated labour market”. She is German and has a BSc in Economics from the London School of Economics and an MPhil in Development Studies from the IDS, Sussex.

Bridging the Gender Gap: Creating a National Pre-apprenticeship Program to Prepare Women for the Iron Working Industry

A highly skilled trade, unionized ironworkers begin their careers as apprentices, benefiting from a combination of on-the-job training and related classroom instruction. Over the course of a three-year apprenticeship, an ironworker in Chicago will go from an hourly wage of $27.72 to $46.20. A hefty benefit package adds almost another $35 per/hr. to cover health and retirement benefits.

By |2020-11-23T22:46:22-04:00January 1, 2018|IWPR|Comments Off on Bridging the Gender Gap: Creating a National Pre-apprenticeship Program to Prepare Women for the Iron Working Industry

The Gender Wage Gap: 2016; Earnings Differences by Gender, Race, and Ethnicity

The ratio of women’s and men’s median annual earnings was 80.5 percent for full-time, year-round workers in 2016, an improvement of 0.9 percentage points since 2015.

By |2020-11-23T22:58:53-04:00September 13, 2017|IWPR|Comments Off on The Gender Wage Gap: 2016; Earnings Differences by Gender, Race, and Ethnicity

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation 2016; and by Race and Ethnicity

Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women.

By |2020-11-23T23:07:16-04:00April 4, 2017|IWPR|Comments Off on The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation 2016; and by Race and Ethnicity

The Gender Wage Gap 2016: Earnings Differences by Race and Ethnicity

The gender wage gap for weekly full-time workers in the United States narrowed slightly between 2015 and 2016. In 2016, the ratio of women’s to men’s median weekly full-time earnings was 81.9 percent, an increase of 0.8 percentage points since 2015, when the ratio was 81.1 percent, leaving a wage gap of 18.1 percentage points down from 19.9 percentage points in 2015.

By |2020-11-23T23:10:22-04:00March 7, 2017|IWPR|Comments Off on The Gender Wage Gap 2016: Earnings Differences by Race and Ethnicity

Supportive Services in Workforce Development Programs: Administrator Perspectives on Availability and Unmet Needs

Workforce development programs offer much-needed skills training to un- and under-employed Americans. Many such individuals also face personal challenges that prevent them from completing their training.

By |2020-11-13T03:47:31-04:00December 13, 2016|IWPR|Comments Off on Supportive Services in Workforce Development Programs: Administrator Perspectives on Availability and Unmet Needs

Undervalued and Underpaid in America: Women in Low-Wage, Female-Dominated Jobs

This report investigates women’s experiences in large, low-wage, growing, female-dominated occupations, comparing demographic data and indicators of economic security between 1994 and 2014, and projecting growth rates to 2024.

Executive Summary–Pathways to Equity: Narrowing the Wage Gap by Improving Women’s Access to Good Middle-Skill Jobs

This report addresses women’s access to well-paid, growing, middle-skill jobs (jobs that do not require a bachelor’s degree). It documents sex segregation in middle-skill jobs, and discusses how gender integration of good jobs could both reduce skill-shortages and improve women’s economic security.

By |2020-11-23T22:54:19-04:00March 24, 2016|IWPR|Comments Off on Executive Summary–Pathways to Equity: Narrowing the Wage Gap by Improving Women’s Access to Good Middle-Skill Jobs

The Union Advantage for Women

This briefing paper presents an analysis of women’s union membership and the union wage and benefit advantage for women by state and by race/ethnicity. It is based on an analysis of the Current Population Survey. Wage and benefit data are for all workers covered by a union contract, irrespective of their membership in a union.

The Status of Women in the States: 2015

The Status of Women in the States: 2015 provides critical data to identify areas of progress for women in states across the nation and pinpoint where additional improvements are still needed. It presents hundreds of data points for each state across seven areas that affect women’s lives: political participation, employment and earnings, work and family, poverty and opportunity, reproductive rights, health and well-being, and violence and safety.

By |2020-08-26T23:23:39-04:00May 20, 2015|Report, Status of Women|Comments Off on The Status of Women in the States: 2015

The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation 2014 and by Race and Ethnicity

Women’s median earnings are lower than men’s in nearly all occupations, whether they work in occupations predominantly done by women, occupations predominantly done by men, or occupations with a more even mix of men and women.

By |2020-11-14T23:52:38-04:00April 14, 2015|IWPR|Comments Off on The Gender Wage Gap by Occupation 2014 and by Race and Ethnicity
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